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When I respond, or seek responses, I think of the Internet Republic and the people [[whump]] and the places who have made our water world Eden brave and free and fair. Permitted, required, and impossible. Stand alone or stand with, whose choice to what degree [[Thn/]] O[[thn/]]ne water world Eden under "We the people" – created by whom?

xref: biometric, voice-print recognition

JULY 23, 2012, 2:04 PM1 Comment
Parenting Dilemmas in the Age of Facial Recognition
By SOMINI SENGUPTA

Rainier Ehrhardt/Getty Images
Facebook has the largest photo bank of any company in the world.
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A picture is worth a lot more than a thousand words in the era of facial recognition.

With so many of our daily movements recorded so easily and artfully, it is hard to know how to react anymore to pictures being taken — and what will be done with them. Social norms are yet to be written, and the issue is all the more pronounced when it comes to pictures of children.

What if a bemused stranger starts taking pictures of your child in a public place? What if a music school posts pictures of your child on its Web site? What do you say to birthday party pictures on other people’s Facebook pages?

I have a young child, and I thought of these things in light of two parallel developments around facial recognition.

Google announced last week a new tool to allow users to obscure faces in videos that are posted on YouTube. It patted itself on the back for being among the first Internet companies to offer a visual anonymity tool.

“Whether you want to share sensitive protest footage without exposing the faces of the activists involved, or share the winning point in your 8-year-old’s basketball game without broadcasting the children’s faces to the world,” the company said in a blog post, “our face blurring technology is a first step towards providing visual anonymity for video on YouTube.”

The same day, a Facebook representative appeared on Capitol Hill to answer legislators’ questions about its use of facial recognition technology. Some 300 million photos are uploaded every day on the social networking site, making Facebook the largest photo bank of any company in the world. Where faces are part of the photo, Facebook can identify the people by name and “tag” them. The only way to avoid being tagged is to tweak your settings to disable it. (In “Privacy Settings,” go to “Timeline and Tagging” and check the “No One” box in answer to the question “Who sees tag suggestions when photos that look like you are uploaded?”)

Facebook’s logic of facial recognition by default seemed to infuriate Senator Al Franken, Democrat of Minnesota, who sponsored the legislative hearing. His most pointed question to the Facebook representative, Rob Sherman, came at the end. Can you assure users that the facial data will not be sold to a third party in the future, Mr. Frankel asked. Mr. Sherman answered that no one can say how Facebook would evolve in the future.

I found this to be a refreshingly candid response. We are at the mercy of private corporations to decide how much control we have over how our pictures are used. One day, a benevolent Silicon Valley firm waves a magic wand and grants us a way to blur our image online. What about the next day? Could the company change its mind? Could another company develop new ways to profit from our pictures – and not tell us? And how will Facebook and all those application developers connected to Facebook use its rich repository of “faceprints,” as some people have called them, in the coming years? No one knows.

Keep in mind that by downloading some applications on Facebook, you give the company access to all your pictures.

Legislators have dangled the threat of regulation. Facebook and Google have both stepped up lobbying in Washington. Facebook reported last week that it spent close to $1 million in the second quarter of 2012; Google spends considerably more.

Why does this matter? It matters because our faces can be more revealing today than at any time in the past. They can potentially connect our offline and online existences.

Facial recognition technology can be vital, for instance, in nabbing criminals. It can also be used to identify people at a Tea Party meeting or a protest in Tahrir Square or, with so many cameras in public places, compile a record of all those who pass in front of a certain mosque or synagogue.

Our faces are immutable, as Sarah Downey, a lawyer who works for Abine, a company that offers free and paid tools to guard online identity, points out. It is one thing, she said, to post photos online of your children for friends and family members to see. It is another when advancing technology allows that photo to be connected to all the other data that’s out there about your families, including potentially where you live. “Everything they are doing is inescapably documented,” Ms. Downey said.

Abine is not a disinterested party in this debate. Its tools include one known as “delete me,” which promises to expunge your digital footprint from data broker Web sites.

Meanwhile, as we figure out what to do when others post pictures of us, one Oregon company this month figured out how to build a new imaging tool that can attach itself to unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones. With new technology, it announced in a news release, “we are now recognizing faces and reading license plates from stand-off ranges beyond audible detectability.” Drones, in other words, can be fitted with cameras that are good enough to recognize faces from so far away that we wouldn’t ever hear them whirring overhead.

===========NH:
xref: biometric, voice-print recognition
=========NH//

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

“Insatiable demand,” HRC re: USA followed by, “Voracious appetite,” BHO seconding HRC.

#60 of 62: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 22 Jul 2012 (07:36 AM)

U.S. Drug War Expands to Africa, a Newer Hub for Cartels
By CHARLIE SAVAGE and THOM SHANKER
Published: July 21, 2012
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WASHINGTON — In a significant expansion of the war on drugs, the
United States has begun training an elite unit of counternarcotics
police in Ghana and planning similar units in Nigeria and Kenya as part
of an effort to combat the Latin American cartels that are
increasingly using Africa to smuggle cocaine into Europe.
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William R. Brownfield of the State Department is a leading architect
of new antidrug strategies.

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The growing American involvement in Africa follows an earlier
escalation of antidrug efforts in Central America, according to
documents, Congressional testimony and interviews with a range of
officials at the State Department, the Drug Enforcement Administration
and the Pentagon.

In both regions, American officials are responding to fears that
crackdowns in more direct staging points for smuggling — like Mexico
and Spain — have prompted traffickers to move into smaller and weakly
governed states, further corrupting and destabilizing them.

The aggressive response by the United States is also a sign of how
greater attention and resources have turned to efforts to fight drugs
as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have wound down.

“We see Africa as the new frontier in terms of counterterrorism and
counternarcotics issues,” said Jeffrey P. Breeden, the chief of the
D.E.A.’s Europe, Asia and Africa section. “It’s a place that we need to
get ahead of — we’re already behind the curve in some ways, and we
need to catch up.”

The initiatives come amid a surge in successful interdictions in
Honduras since May — but also as American officials have been forced to
defend their new tactics after a commando-style team of D.E.A. agents
participated in at least three lethal interdiction operations alongside
a squad of Honduran police officers. In one of those operations, in
May, the Honduran police killed four people near the village of Ahuas,
and in two others in the past month American agents have shot and
killed smuggling suspects.

To date, officials say, the D.E.A. commando team has not been deployed
to work with the newly created elite police squads in Africa, where
the effort to counter the drug traffickers is said to be about three
years behind the one in Central America.

The officials said that if Western security forces did come to play a
more direct operational role in Africa, for historical reasons they
might be European and not American.

In May, William R. Brownfield, the assistant secretary of state for
international narcotics and law enforcement, a leading architect of the
strategy now on display in Honduras, traveled to Ghana and Liberia to
put the finishing touches on a West Africa Cooperative Security
Initiative, which will try to replicate across 15 nations the steps
taken in battling trafficking groups operating in Central America and
Mexico.

Mr. Brownfield said the vision for both regions was to improve the
ability of nations to deal with drug trafficking, by building up their
own institutions and getting them to cooperate with one another,
sharing intelligence and running regional law enforcement training
centers.

But because drug traffickers have already moved into Africa, he said,
there is also a need for the immediate elite police units that have
been trained and vetted.

“We have to be doing operational stuff right now because things are
actually happening right now,” Mr. Brownfield said.

Some specialists have expressed skepticism about the approach. Bruce
Bagley, a professor at the University of Miami who focuses on Latin
America and counternarcotics, said that what had happened in West
Africa over the past few years was the latest example of the
“Whac-A-Mole” problem, in which making trafficking more difficult in
one place simply shifts it to another.

“As they put on the pressure, they are going to detour routes, but
they are not going to stop the flow, because the institutions are
incredibly weak — I don’t care how much vetting they do,” Professor
Bagley said. “And there is always blowback to this. You start killing
people in foreign countries — whether criminals or not — and there is
going to be fallout.”

==========NH:
xref: cornering DC cab drivers.
=========NH//

volley2.ind 174: ?>*:\ …//2012:07:17:12:02:105*
#61 of 62: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 22 Jul 2012 (07:36 AM)

xref: “ON the table, NOT under the table,”

volley2.ind 174: ?>*:\ …//2012:07:17:12:02:105*
#62 of 62: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 22 Jul 2012 (07:38 AM)

American government officials acknowledge the challenges, but they are
not as pessimistic about the chances of at least pushing the
trafficking organizations out of particular countries. And even if the
intervention leads to an increase in violence as organizations that had
operated with impunity are challenged, the alternative, they said, is
worse.

“There is no such thing as a country that is simply a transit country,
for the very simple reason that the drug trafficking organization
first pays its network in product, not in cash, and is constantly
looking to build a greater market,” Mr. Brownfield said. “Regardless of
the name of the country, eventually the transit country becomes a
major consumer nation, and at that point they have a more serious
problem.”

=========NH:
xref: “Insatiable demand,” HRC re: USA followed by, “Voracious
appetite,” BHO seconding HRC.
========NH//

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

LA Times news environment – notice story on urination. Also xref: “I cannot tell a lie,”

Getty Images / Los Angeles Times
The quarterback guru’s magic touch
By Gary Klein | 8:30 p.m.
Steve Clarkson’s success developing QBs such as Heisman-winner Matt Leinart, left, and USC’s Matt Barkley, right, has made him one of the hottest private coaches in the land. Photos

Swing voters: Diverse, misunderstood and crucial in 2012
By David Lauter
Far from a uniform band of centrists, swing voters include anti-corporate pacifists, tea party activists and many shades of political gray in between.
Illinois primary could be Rick Santorum’s big chance
Analysis: Romney’s grasp of nomination seems secure
Gov. Brown takes tougher tack on taxing the wealthy
By Anthony York | 6:08 p.m.
In a deal with a union on his ballot initiative, the governor pares the sales-tax provision and hikes rates on the rich.
Goldman workers describe ‘ripping their clients off,’ exec says
By Walter Hamilton and Nathaniel Popper
A departing executive accused Goldman Sachs of losing its moral compass and being overtaken by greed.
N.J. man cheated co-workers out of $38-million jackpot, jury says
‘Desperate Housewives’ trial goes to jury
Syria can’t escape international law’s ‘long reach,’ Cameron says
Iran’s president faces rare grilling session
San Diego student complains of being forced to urinate in bucket

LA Times news environment – notice story on urination. Also xref: “I cannot tell a lie,”

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

NYTimes news environment

Santorum Sweeps 2 Southern States

=========NH:
xref: finally put pencil down here; xref: exams who has taken. Then looked at it again. Then started cleaning up.
=========NH//

Wins Turn Contest Into Delegate Fight With Romney
By JEFF ZELENY 35 minutes ago
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Rick Santorum captured twin victories on Tuesday, amplifying his argument that the Republican nominating fight is becoming a two-man race with Mitt Romney.
Obama Allies Fear G.O.P. Head Start on ‘Super PACs’
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE and MICHAEL LUO 11:06 PM ET
Democrats are warning that a huge cash advantage by Republicans overwhelm President Obama.
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Mike Stone/Reuters

Josh Haner/The New York Times

Josh Haner/The New York Times

Josh Haner/The New York Times

Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times

Damon Winter/The New York Times

12345678

Rick Santorum greeted supporters at a victory rally on Tuesday.
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Syria Expands Assault, Hitting Rebel Enclaves
By ANNE BARNARD and RICK GLADSTONE 11 minutes ago
BEIRUT, Lebanon — Emboldened by faltering diplomacy and a Russian pledge to keep supplying weapons, Syria’s forces invaded the city of Idlib.
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Obama Promises Thorough Inquiry Into Afghan Attack
By MARK LANDLER 2:33 PM ET
WASHINGTON — In his first public remarks on the rampage, the president said he was “heartbroken by the loss of innocent life.”
Home Base of Accused Soldier Has Faced Scrutiny
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Are China’s police hamstrung by a lack of power to detain national-security suspects?

The loans also appeared to have lowered borrowing costs for countries like Italy and Spain, bed

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Legalizing the Tools of Repression
NICHOLAS BEQUELIN
Published: February 29, 2012
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Are China’s police hamstrung by a lack of power to detain national-security suspects?
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Related in News

Times Topic: China
What looks like an odd question to outsiders, given the notoriously elastic scope of what constitutes national security under China’s one-party system, has actually been the focus of one of the most intense behind-the-scenes political battles ahead of the leadership transition next October from President Hu Jintao to his likely successor, Xi Jinping.

The focus of the battle is a long-in-the-works set of revisions to the Criminal Procedure Law, which is expected to be adopted next month at the last annual plenary session of the National People’s Congress under Hu.

The more progressive-minded factions of the Communist Party and the government consider legal reforms to be integral to China’s modernization. They see enlightened self-interest in giving a greater role to the rule of law, and reforming the criminal code to offer due-process rights that resemble international norms is a key part of this effort.

The other camp is made up of the powerful security apparatus and the more conservative and hard-line elements in the party and the government. This faction has become increasingly powerful since it was assigned the leading role for the security of the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

To this group, the law is purely instrumental — a tool of state power — and should not be altered to empower the citizenry and curtail the authority of the party. The hard-liners believe it is critical to allow security services to deal expediently with threats to the broadest possible interpretation of national security and public order, even if that means frequent miscarriages of justice.

Both camps have made their mark on the draft of the new criminal-procedure law.

Reformers have included provisions requiring prompt access to a lawyer and protection against coerced confessions. Procedures would be stronger for hearing death penalty cases, cross-examining witnesses and excluding evidence obtained by torture. Juveniles and mentally ill defendants will receive additional protections. If implemented — admittedly a big if — this would constitute significant progress.

But the security apparatus has also gotten its way. Under the guise of regulating “residential surveillance,” Article 73 of the revised law would effectively legalize secret detentions and “disappearances” of people viewed as political risks by the government. This would legalize a pernicious practice that has recently been used against the artist Ai Weiwei, the lawyer Gao Zhisheng and the Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo. Up to now, such abductions have been technically illegal.

Article 73 would allow the police to secretly detain citizens for up to six months on suspicion of “endangering state security” or “terrorism” — two vague charges that have long been manipulated by the government to crack down on dissidents, human-rights lawyers, civil-society activists and Tibetan and Uighur separatists.

Even more chilling, these secret detentions would be carried out in venues controlled by the police outside of regular detention facilities, greatly increasing the likelihood of ill-treatment. Gao Zhisheng, for example, was tortured while in such detention.

When the draft legislation was first published for public consultation last summer an unusual firestorm of protest erupted in the domestic media, on the Internet and in legal circles. The Chinese human rights community, in particular, unanimously expressed alarm at what Hu Jia — one of China’s best-known activists and a veteran of “residential surveillance” — termed the “KGB clause.”

Why is China’s leadership considering giving more powers to the security services, when it means bringing into disrepute what otherwise could have be an important legal reform?

One reason is that on any given day, 200 to 300 protests take place across China. The scale of the protests varies from less than a dozen people to tens of thousands. The protests are fueled by a host of labor, environmental and livelihood issues, compounded by corruption and abuses of power, primarily among local officials. Unable to take their grievances to the courts, a growing number of people are taking them to the streets. Often, only the police stand between “the masses” and the party.

Second, the leadership is increasingly concerned that it is losing the battle against the spread of “global values” among the citizenry — code in China for human rights, the rule of law and freedom of expression. Hard-liners believe they need the power to take dissidents and critics “off the grid,” both to silence them and to make an example of them to others. Legalizing “disappearances” provides just the tool.

Whether Xi Jinping and the new leadership will be more inclined than Hu to address public concerns and engage in reforms remains anyone’s guess. But if the security services solidify their power further, they may pose a greater challenge to reform down the line.

The rise of the national security faction is one of the most foreboding trends in China. Whether Article 73 is adopted or not will signal a great deal about whether China is making progress toward the rule of law or solidifying the supremacy of the security state.

Nicholas Bequelin is senior researcher on Asia at Human Rights Watch.

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Is this an intentional foul to make whose self insurance for peaceful and defensive use only look good? Or is it tag team bullying on the play ground between at risk students?

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#459 of 463: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (11:45 PM)

U.S. Sees Iran Attacks as Likely if Israel Strikes

Ali Mohammadi/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
An Iranian soldier participated in naval exercises in the Strait of
Hormuz last year. Iran could try to block, even temporarily, the strait
to further unsettle oil markets.
By THOM SHANKER, HELENE COOPER and ETHAN BRONNER
Published: February 29, 2012
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WASHINGTON — American officials who have assessed the likely Iranian
responses to any attack by Israel on its nuclear program believe that
Iran would retaliate by launching missiles on Israel and
terrorist-style attacks on United States civilian and military
personnel overseas.
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Iran Calls Nuclear Arms Production a ‘Great Sin’ (February 29, 2012)
Iran Raid Seen as a Huge Task for Israeli Jets (February 20, 2012)
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Reuters
Iranian cadets at graduation. American and Israeli officials believe
that the last thing Iran would want is a war on its territory.
While a missile retaliation against Israel would be virtually certain,
according to these assessments, Iran would also be likely to try to
calibrate its response against American targets so as not to give the
United States a rationale for taking military action that could
permanently cripple Tehran’s nuclear program. “The Iranians have been
pretty good masters of escalation control,” said Gen. James E.
Cartwright, now retired, who as the top officer at Strategic Command
and as vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff participated in war
games involving both deterrence and retaliation on potential
adversaries like Iran.

The Iranian targets, General Cartwright and other American analysts
believe, would include petroleum infrastructure in the Persian Gulf,
and American troops in Afghanistan, where Iran has been accused of
shipping explosives to local insurgent forces.

Both American and Israeli officials who discussed current thinking on
the potential ramifications of an Israeli attack believe that the last
thing Iran would want is a full-scale war on its territory. Their
analysis, however, also includes the broad caveat that it is impossible
to know the internal thinking of the senior leadership in Tehran, and
is informed by the awareness that even the most detailed war games
cannot predict how nations and their leaders will react in the heat of
conflict. Yet such assessments are not just intellectual exercises. Any
conclusions on how the Iranians will react to an attack will help
determine whether the Israelis launch a strike — and what the American
position will be if they do.

While evidence suggests that Iran continues to make progress toward a
nuclear weapons program, American intelligence officials believe that
there is no hard evidence that Iran has decided to build a nuclear
bomb. But the possibility that Israel will launch a pre-emptive strike
has become a focus of American policy makers and is expected to be a
primary topic when Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel meets
with President Obama at the White House on Monday.

In November, Israel’s defense minister, Ehud Barak, said any Iranian
retaliation for an Israeli attack would be “bearable,” and his
government’s estimate that Iran is engaging in a bluff has been a key
element in the heightened expectations that Israel is considering a
strike. But Iran’s highly compartmentalized security services, analysts
caution, may operate in semi-rogue fashion, following goals that seem
irrational to planners in Washington. American experts, for example,
are still puzzled by a suspected Iranian plot last year to assassinate
the Saudi ambassador in Washington.

“Once military strikes and counterstrikes begin, you are on the
tiger’s back,” said Ray Takeyh, a former Obama administration national
security official who is now at the Council on Foreign Relations. “And
when on the tiger’s back, you cannot always pick the place to
dismount.”

If Israel did attack, officials said, Iran would be foolhardy, even
suicidal, to invite an overpowering retaliation by directly attacking
United States military targets — by, for example, unleashing its
missiles at American bases on the territory of Persian Gulf allies.
“The balance the Iranians will try to strike is doing damage that is
sufficiently significant, but just short of what it would take for
America to invade,” said General Cartwright, now at the Center for
Strategic and International Studies.

A former Israeli official said the best way to think about retaliation
against Israel was through a formula he called “1991 plus 2006 plus
Buenos Aires times 3 or 5.” The reference was to three instances in the
last two decades when Israel came under attack: the Scud missiles sent
by Saddam Hussein into Israel in 1991 during the first gulf war; the
3,000 rockets fired at Israel by Hezbollah during their 2006 war; and
the attacks on the Israeli Embassy and a Jewish center in Argentina in
the early 1990s. Those attacks each killed 100 to 200 people, wounded
scores more and caused several billion dollars of property damage.
Hundreds of thousands of Israelis in the north had to be evacuated from
their homes to bomb shelters or further south during the 2006 war.

But there is a broad Israeli assessment that Iran’s response to an
attack would be limited.

1 2 NEXT PAGE »
Thom Shanker and Helene Cooper reported from Washington, and Ethan
Bronner from Jerusalem. Eric Schmitt contributed reporting from
Washington.

===========NH:
But as to loss of Israeli moral high ground in the continuing living
word of God…

Especially when no self insurance for peaceful use policy has been
offered first…
=========NH//

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#460 of 463: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (11:46 PM)

U.S. Sees Iran Attacks as Likely if Israel Strikes
Published: February 29, 2012
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(Page 2 of 2)

“If Iran is struck surgically, it will react — no doubt,” said the
former Israeli official, echoing Mr. Barak’s comments last year. “But
that reaction will be calculated and in proportion to its capabilities.
Iran will not set the Middle East on fire.”
Related

Iran Calls Nuclear Arms Production a ‘Great Sin’ (February 29, 2012)
Iran Raid Seen as a Huge Task for Israeli Jets (February 20, 2012)
Times Topics: Iran | Israel

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“Is 40 missiles on Tel Aviv nice?” the official asked, summing up the
Israeli calculus. “No. But it’s better than a nuclear Iran.”

=========NH:
and just enough to keep the extortionists playing the protection
racket game in charge of their sheep without having to covertly
intimidate them yourselves?
=========NH//

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#461 of 463: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (11:48 PM)

By contrast, administration, military and intelligence officials say
Iran would most likely choose anonymous, indirect attacks against
nations it views as supporting Israeli policy, in the hope of offering
Tehran at least public deniability. Iran also might try to block, even
temporarily, the Strait of Hormuz to further unsettle oil markets.

An increase in car bombs set off against civilian targets in world
capitals would also be possible. And Iran would almost certainly
smuggle high-powered explosives across its border into Afghanistan,
where they could be planted along roadways and set off by surrogate
forces to kill and maim American and NATO troops — much as it did in
Iraq during the peak of violence there. But Iran’s primary goal would
be quickly rebuilding — and probably accelerating — its nuclear
program, and thus, according to these assessments, it would be likely
to try to avoid inviting a punishing second wave of attacks by the
United States.

==========NH:
[thn/]
==========NH//

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#462 of 463: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (11:49 PM)

Vali Nasr, a professor of international politics at the Fletcher
School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University,

==========NH:
xref: Great circles, d-LSD-25 mafias, artists, Hollywood, and what
else? Independence. And what else?
==========NH//
=======NH:
Vale? Vassar?
=========NH//

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#463 of 463: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (11:56 PM)

U.S. Sees Iran Attacks as Likely if Israel Strikes
Published: February 29, 2012
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(Page 2 of 2)

“If Iran is struck surgically, it will react — no doubt,” said the
former Israeli official, echoing Mr. Barak’s comments last year. “But
that reaction will be calculated and in proportion to its capabilities.
Iran will not set the Middle East on fire.”
Related

Iran Calls Nuclear Arms Production a ‘Great Sin’ (February 29, 2012)
Iran Raid Seen as a Huge Task for Israeli Jets (February 20, 2012)
Times Topics: Iran | Israel

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Follow @nytimesworld for international breaking news and headlines.
Twitter List: Reporters and Editors
“Is 40 missiles on Tel Aviv nice?” the official asked, summing up the
Israeli calculus. “No. But it’s better than a nuclear Iran.”

By contrast, administration, military and intelligence officials say
Iran would most likely choose anonymous, indirect attacks against
nations it views as supporting Israeli policy, in the hope of offering
Tehran at least public deniability. Iran also might try to block, even
temporarily, the Strait of Hormuz to further unsettle oil markets.

An increase in car bombs set off against civilian targets in world
capitals would also be possible. And Iran would almost certainly
smuggle high-powered explosives across its border into Afghanistan,
where they could be planted along roadways and set off by surrogate
forces to kill and maim American and NATO troops — much as it did in
Iraq during the peak of violence there. But Iran’s primary goal would
be quickly rebuilding — and probably accelerating — its nuclear
program, and thus, according to these assessments, it would be likely
to try to avoid inviting a punishing second wave of attacks by the
United States.

Vali Nasr, a professor of international politics at the Fletcher
School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, said Iran would “have
to retaliate visibly against Israel to protect its image at home and in
the region.” Along a second line of reprisals, Iran also “would try
and keep the United States busy by escalating tensions in Lebanon,
Syria, Egypt, Iraq and Afghanistan,” he said.

In 2009, the Brookings Institution held a simulation to assess Day 2
of an Israeli attack on Iran, casting former government officials,
diplomats and regional experts in the roles of American, Israeli and
Iranian officials. Karim Sadjadpour, of the Carnegie Endowment for
International Peace, played Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei. The faux Iranian leadership had to “calibrate their response
with great precision,” he said. “If they respond too little, they could
lose face, and if they respond too much, they could lose their heads.”

During the simulation, Iran also fired missiles at Israeli military
and nuclear targets, and unleashed Hezbollah, Hamas and Islamic Jihad
militants to fire rockets at population centers in Israel, with a goal
to create an atmosphere of terror among Israelis. In the simulation,
Iran also activated terrorist cells in Europe, which bombed public
transportation and killed civilians.

Mr. Sadjadpour said that one thing the exercise demonstrated was how
quickly things would deteriorate, adding that “as for long-term
consequences, it’s way too murky to say anything but this: It will be
ugly.”

« PREVIOUS PAGE 1 2
Thom Shanker and Helene Cooper reported from Washington, and Ethan
Bronner from Jerusalem. Eric Schmitt contributed reporting from
Washington.

==========NH:
vs. “Put your money where your mouth is” – self insurance of peaceful
and defensive use only of uranium.
==========NH//

=========NH:
xref: the traditional argument: “I don’t agree with what you say, but
I will defend to the death your right to say it,”

vs. these childish games by “tough guys” in the “protection racket”
who have failed to offer any kind of self-insurance of peaceful and
defensive use only of uranium – on EITHER side.

And who all so in debt trying to woo their ‘sheep’ who has not moved
close enough to God to comprehend sovereign assets and appreciation
through homogeneous assessment, eminent domain, and the right of
repurchase, lease, or rental…

Lord of the Flies, gangs of bullies – judge not that ye be not judged,
diagnose and heal so that your self might be [thnk/]

May whose self insurance proposal get heard widely enough soon enough
to make one and all ask the question, “Why hash’ it been offered?”
===========NH//

Is this an intentional foul to make whose self insurance for peaceful and defensive use only look good? Or is it tag team bullying on the play ground between at risk students?

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Notice the way comprehensive eminent domain to appreciate sovereign asset values is not unlike Google integration of services into a homogenous asset rather than a fractionated conglomerate of independent bailiwicks; xref: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjbEOOQ3n3o

#448 of 453: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (10:08 PM)

France Says Google Privacy Plan Likely Violates European Law

Georges Gobet/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
Viviane Reding, the European Commission’s official in charge of
privacy, has called for uniform privacy rules in Europe.
By ERIC PFANNER
Published: February 28, 2012
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PARIS — The French data protection authority said on Tuesday that
Google’s new privacy policy appeared to violate European Union law.
Related

Times Topic: Google Inc.
Google announced the new policy last month, billing it as a way to
streamline and simplify the privacy practices it employed worldwide
across about 60 different online services, and to introduce greater
clarity for users.

But the French privacy agency, the National Commission for Computing
and Civil Liberties, said in a letter to Larry Page, Google’s
co-founder and chief executive, that the proposed policy was murky in
the details of how the company would use private data. Google and other
Internet companies gather personal information in an effort to build
anonymous profiles of users, helping them to sell advertising.

“Rather than promoting transparency, the terms of the new policy and
the fact that Google claims publicly that it will combine data across
services raises fears about Google’s actual practices,” the letter from
the French privacy agency, known as CNIL, said. “Our preliminary
investigation shows that it is extremely difficult to know exactly
which data is combined between which services for which purposes, even
for trained privacy professionals.”

The warning to Google carries potential implications for other
European Union countries, because in this case the French regulator was
acting at the request of an advisory panel to the European Commission

==========NH:
Dear Larry and Sergey: [Achoo! ]’. ‘/.]

Whatever the system in place now is, it put a jockey under ware ad up
on my browser for weeks and weeks after I placed an order or two –
thereby making me reject and develop a dislike for the brand being
forced upon me so much.

You’ve got to get real and incorporate choices into the ads so you can
reinforce the ad to go deeper, or ask it to go wider, or ask it to go
random – because different people have different tastes about patterns
they like to see.

Being the righteous people you are is the biggest help to me. Stop the
information apartheid. Give we the users more control. Let us get to
any percentage of our search results by entering the percentage instead
of having to scroll in ten page lumps.

What else? Put me on the board of directors, or hire me as a
consultant. I could use the money. I need to travel more, and it would
certainly help me hire an assistant or two to get publishing regularly
instead of dusting away on the key board.

Right?

Who was kind enough to come buy and ask me to use Google way back in
the early days. You and Serge were kind enough to walk by. Why do you,
and so many others, continue to feed off of me, without overtly
rewarding me?

Sure, I’ve assigned myself the toughest job description I could, but
that’s no reason to not do some charity in my direction.

Truly,

Bill, aka, haji MAO-AIB

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#449 of 453: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (10:09 PM)

The warning to Google carries potential implications for other
European Union countries, because in this case the French regulator was
acting at the request of an advisory panel to the European Commission,
which asked the French agency to conduct an initial assessment of the
Google privacy changes. The new rules were set to come into effect on
Thursday.

========NH:
Google announces user choices to steer ads.
Apple makes unilateral bid on Surgeon General’s Button for all US
browser tool bars. Button to be dedicated to the memory of Steve Jobs.
========NH//

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#450 of 453: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (10:13 PM)

the French privacy agency said in its letter that it would send Google
a “full questionnaire” about its privacy policies by mid-March.

=========NH:
xref: steering controls for on line ads. Get various speeds of slide
shows from automated number per minute, up to stroboscopic speeds for
fractions of minutes… make ads interactive before you have to go
somewhere. or make going there give you a parallel window which does
this kind of stuff. “Take an add moment to research the Google Ad
economy”

Wouldn’t you know it would take france to elevate [thnk/] the
conversation from change your password, change your email address to
make adds have steering choices for users.
==============NH//

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#451 of 453: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (10:14 PM)

xref; Amazon: customers who looked at this, also looked at – and / or
purchased –

====NH//

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#452 of 453: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (10:15 PM)

France Says Google Privacy Plan Likely Violates European Law

Georges Gobet/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
Viviane Reding, the European Commission’s official in charge of
privacy, has called for uniform privacy rules in Europe.
By ERIC PFANNER
Published: February 28, 2012
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PARIS — The French data protection authority said on Tuesday that
Google’s new privacy policy appeared to violate European Union law.
Related

Times Topic: Google Inc.
Google announced the new policy last month, billing it as a way to
streamline and simplify the privacy practices it employed worldwide
across about 60 different online services, and to introduce greater
clarity for users.

But the French privacy agency, the National Commission for Computing
and Civil Liberties, said in a letter to Larry Page, Google’s
co-founder and chief executive, that the proposed policy was murky in
the details of how the company would use private data. Google and other
Internet companies gather personal information in an effort to build
anonymous profiles of users, helping them to sell advertising.

“Rather than promoting transparency, the terms of the new policy and
the fact that Google claims publicly that it will combine data across
services raises fears about Google’s actual practices,” the letter from
the French privacy agency, known as CNIL, said. “Our preliminary
investigation shows that it is extremely difficult to know exactly
which data is combined between which services for which purposes, even
for trained privacy professionals.”

The warning to Google carries potential implications for other
European Union countries, because in this case the French regulator was
acting at the request of an advisory panel to the European Commission,
which asked the French agency to conduct an initial assessment of the
Google privacy changes. The new rules were set to come into effect on
Thursday.

Meanwhile, the commission is in the process of overhauling its privacy
rules to bring them in line with the era of the Internet and cloud
computing. The commissioner in charge of privacy, Viviane Reding, has
called for streamlined privacy rules, which currently vary widely
across the European Union, with separate enforcement bodies like the
French privacy agency overseeing national guidelines.

Google is also facing an antitrust investigation in Brussels, where
the European Commission is scrutinizing its dominant position in
Internet search. The privacy policies of individual Google services,
especially its StreetView mapping feature, have also been investigated
in a number of European Union countries.

Ms. Reding had already asked Google to delay adoption of the new
privacy policy while regulators assessed its compatibility with
European Union law. But the company reiterated on Tuesday that it had
no intention of doing so.

“We are confident that our new simple, clear and transparent privacy
policy respects all European data protection laws and principles,”
Peter Fleischer, Google’s chief privacy counsel, wrote in a letter to
the French privacy agency. He said the company had tried unsuccessfully
to meet with the agency to discuss the changes.

“Like all companies, we have struggled with the conundrum of how to
pursue both of the CNIL’s recommendations: How to ‘streamline and
simplify’ our privacy policies, while at the same time providing
‘comprehensive information’ to our users,” Mr. Fleischer’s letter
states.

The French privacy agency said in its letter that it would send Google
a “full questionnaire” about its privacy policies by mid-March.

In addition to issuing warnings, the French privacy agency has the
power to fine companies up to 300,000 euros ($400,000) for privacy
breaches in France. It can also seek court orders to try to stop
companies from engaging in practices that are deemed to violate data
protection laws. Enforcement in other European countries would be up to
individual data protection authorities.

Google’s new privacy policy applies to services like the YouTube
online video platform, the Android mobile phone software and the Google
search engine. Users were notified of the changes via e-mail and
postings on the relevant sites, among other methods.

The proposed changes have also attracted scrutiny in the United
States, where privacy advocates have urged Congress to look into the
new policy.

Big Brother Watch, a British privacy advocate, published a study on
Tuesday that said only 12 percent of Google users had read the new
policy. Forty-seven percent were unaware of the changes, the study
showed.

“Google is putting advertisers’ interests before user privacy and
should not be rushing ahead before the public understand what the
changes will mean,” the group said in a statement posted on its Web
site.

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#453 of 453: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (10:17 PM)

========NH:
Notice the way comprehensive eminent domain to appreciate sovereign
asset values is not unlike Google integration of services into a
homogenous asset rather than a fractionated conglomerate of independent
bailiwicks; xref: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjbEOOQ3n3o
=========NH//

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

NYTimes editoria re: Egypt Revolution

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Empty Talk on Tahrir Square
By TIM SEBASTIAN
Published: February 19, 2012
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CAIRO — Someone has turned out the light in Tahrir Square, and that breathless, undreamed-of conviction that a better country was suddenly within grasp is no longer here.
Enlarge This Image

Marco Longari/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
A group of Egyptians gather near mock gallows in Tahrir Square.
Multimedia
INTERACTIVE FEATURE: The Digital Road to Egypt’s Revolution
Related in News

In Egypt, Signs of Accord Between Military Council and Islamists (January 23, 2012)
Related in Opinion

Opinion: Egypt’s Never-Ending Revolution (February 12, 2012)
Op-Ed Contributor: A Test for Egypt: Hearing All Voices (January 25, 2012)
Only the props remain — the rumor-sellers and spinners and blaring loudspeakers, the committed, the angry and those who still dream. But they seem to matter less these days. Or maybe we’ve heard them all before.

“We’ve agreed on a plan,” says a young man, as if carrying tablets down from the mountain. He shows us photos of his once-beaten face on his mobile phone. “We have a new initiative. Yes, we argued a lot amongst ourselves but now we’re going places.” But he won’t say where.

In the square, stories abound of sexual abuse. A woman is reported to have been raped last month in one of the tents, another was groped after she’d spoken at the podium and had to punch her way through a crowd of jeering men, none of whom lifted a finger to help her.

So even the moral high ground seems to have packed up and gone elsewhere. And with it one of the better-known presidential hopefuls — Mohamed Elbaradei, erstwhile champion of many revolutionaries — who didn’t want to play the game anymore because he didn’t like the rules. Or lack of them.

The military, he said, had assumed control of Egypt “as if no revolution had taken place and no regime had fallen.” And he may be right.

In December the generals did something that in almost any other country would have been outrageous and unimaginable. They offered the central bank a billion–dollar loan to help it through hard times.

Let’s be clear about this: The military high command was offering to loan the Egyptian people money that rightfully belongs to the country anyway — money that is exempt from public scrutiny and on which, as far as anyone can tell, not a penny in tax has ever been paid.

Of course the military has been allowed to run its own finances for decades. But consider this: In these days of political turmoil it takes a supremely confident and powerful group of men to offer the country back its own money and dress it up as largesse.

The move provoked not a single squeak of indignation from a new Parliament that has attached far greater importance to discussing when it should talk and when it should pray. Apparently, no one from this assembly is about to ask any awkward questions about this billion, or any other billion in military accounts. So the army can relax after all — the good times are here to stay.

Parliament’s unwillingness to confront the generals is understandable. After all, they still have higher than 80 percent approval ratings across the country — and they’re still making the key decisions. But it does mean that the new politicians’ first days at school risk being defined by what they won’t do, rather than what they will.

A recent survey of the assembly’s political parties, conducted by Amnesty International, found, for instance, a depressingly patchy response to the question of women’s rights and very little appetite to campaign for female equality.

More alarming, though, is the re-emergence of fear. Once again, I was told, Egyptians are starting to look over their shoulder to see who might be listening, to be careful what they say on the phone, to begin considering all over again who they can and cannot trust.

“The intelligence services are extremely active,” says a well-known commentator.

Fear has been a major by-product of the crisis over American NGOs, now facing prosecution in Egyptian courts and accusations that they were operating illegally in the country. Other foreign-funded organizations report a new hesitation from their Egyptian partners, a “let’s-put-this-on-hold” attitude, a sense that foreigners may become toxic.

That is serious. If the old curtain of fear descends again over Egypt then the climate could be right for a return to full-strength dictatorship. Fear would give it the power.

Of course “it” is chaotic. Of course “it” will take time. But few can agree what “it” is and large swathes of the public no longer seem interested.

Big Egypt, which creaked and trundled about its business for decades, is crying out for some certainty, some normality. The poor want to eat; the business community wants and needs to earn money; one in seven people, employed by the tourist industry, are desperate for the holiday makers to come back. And no one can understand why the dying goes on incessantly in the streets of Cairo and elsewhere.

I don’t hear too many predictions about Egypt’s future. But let me cite a couple of strong impressions: Egyptians have tasted revolution and will likely want to do so again. And no leader here can ever again count on a compliant, docile population.

For now, though, the share-out of spoils from last year’s revolt is more or less complete. Real power has gone back to the military; a Parliament of new faces gets to do the talking; a president is due to be elected later this year.

The only people who don’t seem to know that this uprising is over still argue and dream and make speeches in Tahrir Square.

Tim Sebastian is a television journalist and chairman of The New Arab Debates.

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Iran’s preemptive retaliation against European sanctions comes as U.S. and British officials warn that Israel should avoid any military attack on Iran’s nuclear facilities.

Behrouz Mehri / AFP/Getty Images
Iran cuts off oil to Britain, France
By Patrick J. McDonnell | 4:56 p.m.
Iran’s preemptive retaliation against European sanctions comes as U.S. and British officials warn that Israel should avoid any military attack on Iran’s nuclear facilities.

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

News climate 3. “30 people”; xref; “count people, people count” also xref: 3, 10, and what else?

Bennett Raglin / Getty Images
Above, Rev. Jesse Jackson arrives for the service.

Photos

Video

Appreciation
Whitney Houston memorial service begins in N.J.
By Rick Rojas | 9:44 a.m.
A week after Houston died in a Beverly Hills hotel room, her family and friends gather in Newark, N.J., for an invitation-only service called a “home-going ceremony.”
Who’s performing and speaking? | 8:47 a.m.
Elementary school principal remembers the singer | 8:45 a.m.
Friends, family, stars will honor singer
Fans gather blocks from the site of Houston’s funeral
Full coverage: Whitney Houston’s death
Santorum mocks Romney on Olympics
By Mitchell Landsberg | 8:55 a.m.
Rick Santorum hit Mitt Romney where it hurts, attacking his stewardship of the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.
$100 million in PCP, $400k seized by task force
By Sam Allen
Stunned officials find 130 gallons of the dangerous drug in Los Angeles and Culver City — enough for 10 million doses.
ICE agent told wife of problems before allegedly opening fire | 9:11 a.m.
Naked girl eating from trash cans shocks neighbors
Obama’s campaign travel raises money and criticism
Bomb suspect said he ‘would be happy killing 30 people’

News climate 3. “30 people”; xref; “count people, people count” also xref: 3, 10, and what else?

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

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