waterworldeden4

Icon

When I respond, or seek responses, I think of the Internet Republic and the people [[whump]] and the places who have made our water world Eden brave and free and fair. Permitted, required, and impossible. Stand alone or stand with, whose choice to what degree [[Thn/]] O[[thn/]]ne water world Eden under "We the people" – created by whom?

Syria, UN Security Council, Kofi Annan, VVP Book List, and US DOD

#757 of 757: William Hale (hinging0) Wed 21 Mar 2012 (09:02 PM)

U.N. Council Backs Plan for Ending Syria Conflict
By RICK GLADSTONE
Published: March 21, 2012
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
E-MAIL
PRINT
REPRINTS
SHARE

Overcoming months of bitter division, the United Nations Security
Council delivered a diplomatic setback to President Bashar al-Assad of
Syria on Wednesday, unanimously embracing efforts by Kofi Annan, the
former secretary general, to negotiate a cease-fire in the year-old
Syrian conflict, funnel aid to victims and begin a political
transition.

Tatan Syuflana/Associated Press
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon spoke in Jakarta on Wednesday.
Multimedia

TimesCast | Fighting Continues in Syria
DOCUMENT: Presidential Statement on the Joint Special Envoy on Syria

Connect With Us on Twitter
Follow @nytimesworld for international breaking news and headlines.
Twitter List: Reporters and Editors
In a document known as a presidential statement, the 15-member council
expressed its “gravest concern at the deteriorating situation in
Syria, which has resulted in a serious human rights crisis and a
deplorable humanitarian situation.”

Russia and China, which had used their vetoes on the council to block
efforts to adopt a resolution on the Syrian conflict, agreed to the
statement.

It endorsed a plan by Mr. Annan, publicly revealed in detail for the
first time, that he presented to Mr. Assad in meetings this month as
the special representative of both the United Nations and the Arab
League.

The statement said Mr. Annan’s plan would “facilitate a Syrian-led
political transition to a democratic, plural political system, in which
citizens are equal regardless of their affiliations or ethnicities or
beliefs, including through commencing a comprehensive political
dialogue between the Syrian government and the whole spectrum of the
Syrian opposition.”

The plan closely resembles an Arab League proposal that Mr. Assad has
rejected. It calls for all combatants to immediately stop fighting, for
the military to withdraw from populated areas, for a United
Nations-supervised truce and for the provision of humanitarian
assistance, the release of all arbitrarily detained people, freedom of
movement for journalists and freedom for peaceful demonstrations.

It warns of unspecified “further steps” if Mr. Annan’s plan is not
carried out.

The statement does not have the enforcement muscle of a formal
Security Council resolution. But it reflected some significant
diplomatic bridging of disagreements that had principally pitted
Western and Arab countries against Russia, Mr. Assad’s most important
supporter.

Russia’s endorsement of the statement is an embarrassment for Mr.
Assad, who has refused to negotiate with his political opponents and
has characterized the uprising as a terrorist crime wave.

There was no immediate reaction from Mr. Assad. But the state-run
Syrian Arab News Agency, in a brief dispatch on the Security Council’s
action, emphasized that it satisfied Russia’s insistence that it
contain no ultimatums, threats or “unilateral demands.”

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, who had expressed anger
over Russia’s support for Mr. Assad, praised the Security Council’s
action as “a positive step.”

“The council has now spoken with one voice,” she added.

Mr. Annan said through a spokesman that he was “encouraged by the
united support of the Security Council and urges the Syrian authorities
to respond positively.”

Russia, backed by China, had twice vetoed earlier draft resolutions on
Syria, arguing that they would violate Syria’s sovereignty and did not
equally blame Mr. Assad and his armed antagonists for the crisis.

But Russian officials have shown increasing impatience with Mr. Assad,
and on Tuesday, Foreign Minister Sergey V. Lavrov said Mr. Assad had
made “many mistakes” over the past year.

Speaking to reporters after the Security Council session, Russia’s
ambassador, Vitaly I. Churkin, sought to frame the unanimous action as
a vindication of Russia’s position. “We are very pleased,” he said.
“The Security Council has finally chosen to take a pragmatic look at
the situation in Syria.”

The Security Council also issued a press statement, which Russia had
proposed, that condemned the bombing attacks on Syrian government
targets in Damascus and Aleppo in recent days, for which Mr. Assad has
blamed his opponents. The press statement described those attacks as
terrorism.

==========NH:
xref: quoting you Tuesday, VVP, in a conversation with US DOD
personnel giving an equipment demonstration re: WANTED: 100 books
recommended by each nation; xref: “On Agression” (Lorentz, Konrad);
“Interpersonal Behavior in Small Groups” (Bayles and Leary), “Man and
His Symbols” (Jung, Karl)… 97 to go.

So what books, besides the Qur~an, would you recommend President
Bashar?
=========NH//

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , , , , , , , ,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZsMmTFqSwI&feature=related

Once, pimps routinely advertised Alissa on Backpage.com. She escaped, and now she is a college senior.
By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
Published: March 17, 2012
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
E-MAIL
PRINT
REPRINTS
SHARE

I WENT on a walk in Manhattan the other day with a young woman who once had to work these streets, hired out by eight pimps while she was just 16 and 17. She pointed out a McDonald’s where pimps sit while monitoring the girls outside, and a building where she had repeatedly been ordered online as if she were a pizza.
On the Ground

Share Your Comments About This Column
Nicholas Kristof addresses reader feedback and posts short takes from his travels.
Go to Columnist Page »
Multimedia

Age 16, She Was Sold On Backpage.com
Related in Opinion

Nicholas D. Kristof: How Pimps Use the Web to Sell Girls (January 26, 2012)

Damon Winter/The New York Times
Nicholas D. Kristof
Alissa, her street name, escaped that life and is now a 24-year-old college senior planning to become a lawyer — but she will always have a scar on her cheek where a pimp gouged her with a potato peeler as a warning not to escape. “Like cattle owners brand their cattle,” she said, fingering her cheek, “he wanted to brand me in a way that I would never forget.”

After Alissa testified against her pimps, six of them went to prison for up to 25 years. Yet these days, she reserves her greatest anger not at pimps but at companies that enable them. She is particularly scathing about Backpage.com, a classified advertising Web site that is used to sell auto parts, furniture, boats — and girls. Alissa says pimps routinely peddled her on Backpage.

“You can’t buy a child at Wal-Mart, can you?” she asked me. “No, but you can go to Backpage and buy me on Backpage.”

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

xref: basketball player who fell to court floor in a salat like position while the dull roar of whose drinking club filled the sidewalk at about the time of night when Afghanistan wold be making Fajhr or starting work. So who should call Afghanistan directly regarding 100% withdrawal before election day?

WHITE HOUSE MEMO
Obama Parries Criticism as Fund-Raising Eats Into His Schedule

Luke Sharrett for The New York Times
President Obama posed for a group photograph in Atlanta on Friday. He appeared at five campaign events during the day.
By MARK LANDLER
Published: March 17, 2012
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
E-MAIL
PRINT
REPRINTS
SHARE

ATLANTA — Friday marked another stage in President Obama’s springtime metamorphosis into full-fledged campaigner: his first daylong trip out of the capital devoted solely to fund-raising. He gripped and grinned through five campaign events in Chicago and Atlanta, where the actor and producer Tyler Perry played host to Mr. Obama at his house and television studio.
Related

Times Topic: Campaign Finance (Super PACs)

The Election 2012 App
A one-stop destination for the latest political news — from The Times and other top sources. Plus opinion, polls, campaign data and video.
Download for iPhone
Download for Android
The 13-hour “money run” raised at least $4.8 million for the president’s re-election effort — more than $5 million if one counts a fund-raiser in Minneapolis with Michelle Obama.

How presidents use their time inevitably becomes a target for scrutiny and criticism, particularly when a campaign heats up. The White House insisted this week that Mr. Obama still spends “the vast preponderance of his time on his official duties.” But with his schedule increasingly crowded by fund-raisers and speeches that could easily double as campaign rallies, that case is getting harder and harder to make.

Except for a phone call he made on Friday to President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan shortly after midnight, Mr. Obama’s day was dominated by speeches like the one he gave in a hotel ballroom in Chicago, where he told a faithful crowd that he understood “it’s not as trendy to be involved in the Obama campaign as it was back then.”

Later, in Atlanta, Mr. Obama mingled with Oprah Winfrey at a small fund-raiser at the chateau-style mansion of Mr. Perry, where 40 guests paid $35,800 each to attend. The president thanked Ms. Winfrey for her support in 2008, noting that, as with books and skin cream, her endorsement was critical.

On Thursday, in a speech billed as official rather than campaign, Mr. Obama defended his energy policy, mocking Newt Gingrich, though not by name, as a member of the “Flat Earth Society” for ridiculing investments in alternative energy sources like algae. The crowd rewarded him with chants of “Yes, we can!” and “Four more years!”

Even formal diplomatic events, like the state dinner for Prime Minister David Cameron of Britain on Wednesday, have taken on a political cast. The White House invited more than two dozen big-dollar contributors to mingle with the prime minister and a bevy of British stars from the hit shows “Downton Abbey” and “Homeland.”

Mr. Obama has attended 108 fund-raisers since filing his candidacy in April 2011, double the rate of President George W. Bush at a similar point in his re-election campaign, according to Mark Knoller, a CBS News correspondent who keeps track of these numbers.

Republicans have lost no time highlighting that difference and offering back-of-the-envelope calculations to reporters of how much presidential time this amount of fund-raising is soaking up.

“If you assume two hours per fund-raiser, which is conservative, that’s 200 hours, the equivalent of five workweeks,” said Sean Spicer, a spokesman for the Republican National Committee.

The Obama campaign says the president is simply doing what is needed to counter the fund-raising juggernaut assembled by the Republican candidates and their armada of “super PACs.”

Republicans, however, contend that the problem is less their muscle than Mr. Obama’s weakness. Karl Rove, the Republican strategist, wrote in The Wall Street Journal last week that the Obama campaign’s average monthly fund-raising haul of $24 million put it on track to be “hundreds of millions of dollars shy” of its goal of $1 billion.

The $1 billion figure, the Obama campaign counters, exists only in the mind of Mr. Rove; it was never a campaign goal. A spokesman, Ben LaBolt, noted that Mr. Obama had attracted 1.3 million donors by the end of 2011, with an average contribution of $55. The campaign reached the million-donor benchmark twice as fast as in 2008, Mr. LaBolt added.

While the Obama campaign insists that everything is on track, the White House plays down suggestions that it is dwelling on the campaign. The press secretary, Jay Carney, said he had not asked Mr. Obama whether he had watched “The Road We’ve Traveled,” a newly released campaign video. The video was played before Mr. Obama took to the stage in Chicago, and he referred to it in his remarks.

For Mr. Obama’s staff, the creeping transition to campaign mode creates other awkward moments. Traveling with reporters on Friday, Mr. Carney dodged a question about who pays the expenses of flying Air Force One around the country on a trip like this. (According to the campaign, it covers aspects of the trip that are purely political.)

But the White House is acutely sensitive to suggestions that Mr. Obama is not always on the job. It posted a photograph of his previous call with President Karzai, which he made on Sunday from his sport utility vehicle, in front of a recreation center in Chevy Chase, Md., where his daughter Sasha was playing basketball.

“The president of the United States is the president of the United States 24 hours a day, including when he calls foreign leaders in the very early hours of the morning, and on weekends,” Mr. Carney said.

========NH:
xref: basketball player who fell to court floor in a salat like position while the dull roar of whose drinking club filled the sidewalk at about the time of night when Afghanistan wold be making Fajhr or starting work. So who should call Afghanistan directly regarding 100% withdrawal before election day?
============NH//

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

xref: The cornered response, and what else?

Arab Spring and Iran Tensions Leave Palestinians Sidelined

Ammar Awad/Reuters
The funeral of 23-year-old Talat Ramia, a Palestinian who died during a clash with Israeli soldiers in the West Bank last month.
By ETHAN BRONNER
Published: March 7, 2012
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
COMMENTS (43)
E-MAIL
PRINT
SINGLE PAGE
REPRINTS
SHARE

RAMALLAH, West Bank — In the 14 months since revolution has spread across the Middle East and tension has soared over Iran’s nuclear program, the Palestinian leadership has found itself orphaned. Politically divided, its peace talks with Israel collapsed and its foreign support waning, the Palestinian Authority is sidelined, confused and worried that its people may return to violence.

Connect With Us on Twitter
Follow @nytimesworld for international breaking news and headlines.
Twitter List: Reporters and Editors
Readers’ Comments
Share your thoughts.
Post a Comment »
Read All Comments (43) »
“The biggest challenge we face — apart from occupation — is marginalization,” Salam Fayyad, prime minister of the Palestinian Authority, said in an interview. “This is a direct consequence of the Arab Spring where people are preoccupied with their own domestic affairs. The United States is in an election year and has economic problems, Europe has its worries. We’re in a corner.”

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Are China’s police hamstrung by a lack of power to detain national-security suspects?

The loans also appeared to have lowered borrowing costs for countries like Italy and Spain, bed

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Legalizing the Tools of Repression
NICHOLAS BEQUELIN
Published: February 29, 2012
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
E-MAIL
PRINT
REPRINTS
SHARE

Are China’s police hamstrung by a lack of power to detain national-security suspects?
Enlarge This Image

Frederic J. Brown/AFP — Getty Images
Related in News

Times Topic: China
What looks like an odd question to outsiders, given the notoriously elastic scope of what constitutes national security under China’s one-party system, has actually been the focus of one of the most intense behind-the-scenes political battles ahead of the leadership transition next October from President Hu Jintao to his likely successor, Xi Jinping.

The focus of the battle is a long-in-the-works set of revisions to the Criminal Procedure Law, which is expected to be adopted next month at the last annual plenary session of the National People’s Congress under Hu.

The more progressive-minded factions of the Communist Party and the government consider legal reforms to be integral to China’s modernization. They see enlightened self-interest in giving a greater role to the rule of law, and reforming the criminal code to offer due-process rights that resemble international norms is a key part of this effort.

The other camp is made up of the powerful security apparatus and the more conservative and hard-line elements in the party and the government. This faction has become increasingly powerful since it was assigned the leading role for the security of the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

To this group, the law is purely instrumental — a tool of state power — and should not be altered to empower the citizenry and curtail the authority of the party. The hard-liners believe it is critical to allow security services to deal expediently with threats to the broadest possible interpretation of national security and public order, even if that means frequent miscarriages of justice.

Both camps have made their mark on the draft of the new criminal-procedure law.

Reformers have included provisions requiring prompt access to a lawyer and protection against coerced confessions. Procedures would be stronger for hearing death penalty cases, cross-examining witnesses and excluding evidence obtained by torture. Juveniles and mentally ill defendants will receive additional protections. If implemented — admittedly a big if — this would constitute significant progress.

But the security apparatus has also gotten its way. Under the guise of regulating “residential surveillance,” Article 73 of the revised law would effectively legalize secret detentions and “disappearances” of people viewed as political risks by the government. This would legalize a pernicious practice that has recently been used against the artist Ai Weiwei, the lawyer Gao Zhisheng and the Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo. Up to now, such abductions have been technically illegal.

Article 73 would allow the police to secretly detain citizens for up to six months on suspicion of “endangering state security” or “terrorism” — two vague charges that have long been manipulated by the government to crack down on dissidents, human-rights lawyers, civil-society activists and Tibetan and Uighur separatists.

Even more chilling, these secret detentions would be carried out in venues controlled by the police outside of regular detention facilities, greatly increasing the likelihood of ill-treatment. Gao Zhisheng, for example, was tortured while in such detention.

When the draft legislation was first published for public consultation last summer an unusual firestorm of protest erupted in the domestic media, on the Internet and in legal circles. The Chinese human rights community, in particular, unanimously expressed alarm at what Hu Jia — one of China’s best-known activists and a veteran of “residential surveillance” — termed the “KGB clause.”

Why is China’s leadership considering giving more powers to the security services, when it means bringing into disrepute what otherwise could have be an important legal reform?

One reason is that on any given day, 200 to 300 protests take place across China. The scale of the protests varies from less than a dozen people to tens of thousands. The protests are fueled by a host of labor, environmental and livelihood issues, compounded by corruption and abuses of power, primarily among local officials. Unable to take their grievances to the courts, a growing number of people are taking them to the streets. Often, only the police stand between “the masses” and the party.

Second, the leadership is increasingly concerned that it is losing the battle against the spread of “global values” among the citizenry — code in China for human rights, the rule of law and freedom of expression. Hard-liners believe they need the power to take dissidents and critics “off the grid,” both to silence them and to make an example of them to others. Legalizing “disappearances” provides just the tool.

Whether Xi Jinping and the new leadership will be more inclined than Hu to address public concerns and engage in reforms remains anyone’s guess. But if the security services solidify their power further, they may pose a greater challenge to reform down the line.

The rise of the national security faction is one of the most foreboding trends in China. Whether Article 73 is adopted or not will signal a great deal about whether China is making progress toward the rule of law or solidifying the supremacy of the security state.

Nicholas Bequelin is senior researcher on Asia at Human Rights Watch.

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Notice the way comprehensive eminent domain to appreciate sovereign asset values is not unlike Google integration of services into a homogenous asset rather than a fractionated conglomerate of independent bailiwicks; xref: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjbEOOQ3n3o

#448 of 453: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (10:08 PM)

France Says Google Privacy Plan Likely Violates European Law

Georges Gobet/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
Viviane Reding, the European Commission’s official in charge of
privacy, has called for uniform privacy rules in Europe.
By ERIC PFANNER
Published: February 28, 2012
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
E-MAIL
PRINT
REPRINTS
SHARE

PARIS — The French data protection authority said on Tuesday that
Google’s new privacy policy appeared to violate European Union law.
Related

Times Topic: Google Inc.
Google announced the new policy last month, billing it as a way to
streamline and simplify the privacy practices it employed worldwide
across about 60 different online services, and to introduce greater
clarity for users.

But the French privacy agency, the National Commission for Computing
and Civil Liberties, said in a letter to Larry Page, Google’s
co-founder and chief executive, that the proposed policy was murky in
the details of how the company would use private data. Google and other
Internet companies gather personal information in an effort to build
anonymous profiles of users, helping them to sell advertising.

“Rather than promoting transparency, the terms of the new policy and
the fact that Google claims publicly that it will combine data across
services raises fears about Google’s actual practices,” the letter from
the French privacy agency, known as CNIL, said. “Our preliminary
investigation shows that it is extremely difficult to know exactly
which data is combined between which services for which purposes, even
for trained privacy professionals.”

The warning to Google carries potential implications for other
European Union countries, because in this case the French regulator was
acting at the request of an advisory panel to the European Commission

==========NH:
Dear Larry and Sergey: [Achoo! ]’. ‘/.]

Whatever the system in place now is, it put a jockey under ware ad up
on my browser for weeks and weeks after I placed an order or two –
thereby making me reject and develop a dislike for the brand being
forced upon me so much.

You’ve got to get real and incorporate choices into the ads so you can
reinforce the ad to go deeper, or ask it to go wider, or ask it to go
random – because different people have different tastes about patterns
they like to see.

Being the righteous people you are is the biggest help to me. Stop the
information apartheid. Give we the users more control. Let us get to
any percentage of our search results by entering the percentage instead
of having to scroll in ten page lumps.

What else? Put me on the board of directors, or hire me as a
consultant. I could use the money. I need to travel more, and it would
certainly help me hire an assistant or two to get publishing regularly
instead of dusting away on the key board.

Right?

Who was kind enough to come buy and ask me to use Google way back in
the early days. You and Serge were kind enough to walk by. Why do you,
and so many others, continue to feed off of me, without overtly
rewarding me?

Sure, I’ve assigned myself the toughest job description I could, but
that’s no reason to not do some charity in my direction.

Truly,

Bill, aka, haji MAO-AIB

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#449 of 453: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (10:09 PM)

The warning to Google carries potential implications for other
European Union countries, because in this case the French regulator was
acting at the request of an advisory panel to the European Commission,
which asked the French agency to conduct an initial assessment of the
Google privacy changes. The new rules were set to come into effect on
Thursday.

========NH:
Google announces user choices to steer ads.
Apple makes unilateral bid on Surgeon General’s Button for all US
browser tool bars. Button to be dedicated to the memory of Steve Jobs.
========NH//

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#450 of 453: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (10:13 PM)

the French privacy agency said in its letter that it would send Google
a “full questionnaire” about its privacy policies by mid-March.

=========NH:
xref: steering controls for on line ads. Get various speeds of slide
shows from automated number per minute, up to stroboscopic speeds for
fractions of minutes… make ads interactive before you have to go
somewhere. or make going there give you a parallel window which does
this kind of stuff. “Take an add moment to research the Google Ad
economy”

Wouldn’t you know it would take france to elevate [thnk/] the
conversation from change your password, change your email address to
make adds have steering choices for users.
==============NH//

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#451 of 453: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (10:14 PM)

xref; Amazon: customers who looked at this, also looked at – and / or
purchased –

====NH//

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#452 of 453: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (10:15 PM)

France Says Google Privacy Plan Likely Violates European Law

Georges Gobet/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
Viviane Reding, the European Commission’s official in charge of
privacy, has called for uniform privacy rules in Europe.
By ERIC PFANNER
Published: February 28, 2012
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
E-MAIL
PRINT
REPRINTS
SHARE

PARIS — The French data protection authority said on Tuesday that
Google’s new privacy policy appeared to violate European Union law.
Related

Times Topic: Google Inc.
Google announced the new policy last month, billing it as a way to
streamline and simplify the privacy practices it employed worldwide
across about 60 different online services, and to introduce greater
clarity for users.

But the French privacy agency, the National Commission for Computing
and Civil Liberties, said in a letter to Larry Page, Google’s
co-founder and chief executive, that the proposed policy was murky in
the details of how the company would use private data. Google and other
Internet companies gather personal information in an effort to build
anonymous profiles of users, helping them to sell advertising.

“Rather than promoting transparency, the terms of the new policy and
the fact that Google claims publicly that it will combine data across
services raises fears about Google’s actual practices,” the letter from
the French privacy agency, known as CNIL, said. “Our preliminary
investigation shows that it is extremely difficult to know exactly
which data is combined between which services for which purposes, even
for trained privacy professionals.”

The warning to Google carries potential implications for other
European Union countries, because in this case the French regulator was
acting at the request of an advisory panel to the European Commission,
which asked the French agency to conduct an initial assessment of the
Google privacy changes. The new rules were set to come into effect on
Thursday.

Meanwhile, the commission is in the process of overhauling its privacy
rules to bring them in line with the era of the Internet and cloud
computing. The commissioner in charge of privacy, Viviane Reding, has
called for streamlined privacy rules, which currently vary widely
across the European Union, with separate enforcement bodies like the
French privacy agency overseeing national guidelines.

Google is also facing an antitrust investigation in Brussels, where
the European Commission is scrutinizing its dominant position in
Internet search. The privacy policies of individual Google services,
especially its StreetView mapping feature, have also been investigated
in a number of European Union countries.

Ms. Reding had already asked Google to delay adoption of the new
privacy policy while regulators assessed its compatibility with
European Union law. But the company reiterated on Tuesday that it had
no intention of doing so.

“We are confident that our new simple, clear and transparent privacy
policy respects all European data protection laws and principles,”
Peter Fleischer, Google’s chief privacy counsel, wrote in a letter to
the French privacy agency. He said the company had tried unsuccessfully
to meet with the agency to discuss the changes.

“Like all companies, we have struggled with the conundrum of how to
pursue both of the CNIL’s recommendations: How to ‘streamline and
simplify’ our privacy policies, while at the same time providing
‘comprehensive information’ to our users,” Mr. Fleischer’s letter
states.

The French privacy agency said in its letter that it would send Google
a “full questionnaire” about its privacy policies by mid-March.

In addition to issuing warnings, the French privacy agency has the
power to fine companies up to 300,000 euros ($400,000) for privacy
breaches in France. It can also seek court orders to try to stop
companies from engaging in practices that are deemed to violate data
protection laws. Enforcement in other European countries would be up to
individual data protection authorities.

Google’s new privacy policy applies to services like the YouTube
online video platform, the Android mobile phone software and the Google
search engine. Users were notified of the changes via e-mail and
postings on the relevant sites, among other methods.

The proposed changes have also attracted scrutiny in the United
States, where privacy advocates have urged Congress to look into the
new policy.

Big Brother Watch, a British privacy advocate, published a study on
Tuesday that said only 12 percent of Google users had read the new
policy. Forty-seven percent were unaware of the changes, the study
showed.

“Google is putting advertisers’ interests before user privacy and
should not be rushing ahead before the public understand what the
changes will mean,” the group said in a statement posted on its Web
site.

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#453 of 453: William Hale (hinging0) Tue 28 Feb 2012 (10:17 PM)

========NH:
Notice the way comprehensive eminent domain to appreciate sovereign
asset values is not unlike Google integration of services into a
homogenous asset rather than a fractionated conglomerate of independent
bailiwicks; xref: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjbEOOQ3n3o
=========NH//

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

xref: “I cannot tell a lie,”

THE SATURDAY PROFILE
An Academic Turns Grief Into a Crime-Fighting Tool
By JAVIER C. HERNÁNDEZ
Published: February 24, 2012
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
E-MAIL
PRINT
SINGLE PAGE
REPRINTS
SHARE

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras
Enlarge This Image

Carlos Perez for The New York Times
“I am going to continue this fight, even if I lose my life along the way.” – Julieta Castellanos

Connect With Us on Twitter
Follow @nytimesworld for international breaking news and headlines.
Twitter List: Reporters and Editors
NOT so long ago, Julieta Castellanos could walk to the corner market, order a stack of corn tortillas and two liters of Coca-Cola, then make her way home without a stray glance or an impromptu comment from anyone.

But getting around, she has found, is not so easy anymore. Dr. Castellanos, the leader of Honduras’s largest university, is now under the constant watch of a team of bodyguards, and more often than not, a stranger who catches a glimpse of her signature silk scarves will wave her down with something to say.

“You are the people’s hope,” a taxi driver told her recently.

“I clip your quotes from the newspaper and keep them in my desk drawer,” a co-worker confided.

“We are with you in your fight,” a waiter said.

Since the murder of her youngest son, Rafael Alejandro Vargas, 22, and his friend, Carlos Pineda, 24, by the Honduran national police in October, Dr. Castellanos, 57, has emerged as an unlikely hero here: a civilian willing to wage a public war with drug cartels and their grip on the nation’s institutions.

==============NH:
xref: “I cannot tell a lie,”

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , ,

A call for an Iranian referendum to ask the people A) Do you support self insurance of peaceful use of uranium in the amount of $2 BB of Iran’s IMF SDRs? and B) Do you support Iran developing nuclear weapons for defensive use only?

Atomic Agency Says Iran Is Making Fuel at Protected Site
By DAVID E. SANGER and WILLIAM J. BROAD
Published: February 24, 2012
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
COMMENTS (231)
E-MAIL
PRINT
REPRINTS
SHARE

WASHINGTON — International nuclear inspectors reported on Friday that Iran was moving more rapidly to produce nuclear fuel than many outsiders expected, at a deep underground site that Israel and the United States have said is better protected from attack than Iran’s older facilities.
Multimedia

Graphic
Stages in Developing a Nuclear Nation
DOCUMENT: International Atomic Energy Report on Iran
Related

U.S. Agencies See No Move by Iran to Build a Bomb (February 25, 2012)
Times Topic: Iran’s Nuclear Program

Connect With Us on Twitter
Follow @nytimesworld for international breaking news and headlines.
Twitter List: Reporters and Editors
Readers’ Comments
Readers shared their thoughts on this article.
Read All Comments (231) »
The report by the International Atomic Energy Agency indicated that for the first time, Iran had begun producing fuel inside the new facility, in a mountain near the holy city of Qum. The agency’s inspectors found in their most recent visits that over the past three months, Iran had tripled its production capacity for a more purified type of fuel that is far closer to what is needed to make the core of a nuclear weapon.

The report is likely to inflame the debate over whether Iran is nearing what Israel’s defense minister, Ehud Barak, calls entering a “zone of immunity.”

===========NH:
Every nation has the right to self defense. If Iran is willing to post self-insurance collateral commensurate with the liability of defending itself with nuclear weapons, then Iran, like Israel, or the United States, or Russia, has that right.

A referendum ballot might indicate whether the people of Iran endorse this course of action, or whether they too are being cornered by being required to back leaders who will see to it the entire nation is destroyed if they are.

From whose prayers with those who love Iran, who finds it difficult to believe the leaders of Iran would extort their own people, but who has prayed with only a very few, and whose correspondence with you President Ahmadinejad and Supreme leader S. A. Khamenei might be the exception, rather than the rule, of what is going on behind the scenes in Iran.

xref: the public image of you, BHO – a man of reason vs. the behind the scenes going on under you at CIA, DHP. [thnk/]
=============NH//

A call for an Iranian referendum to ask the people A) Do you support self insurance of peaceful use of uranium in the amount of $2 BB of Iran’s IMF SDRs? and B) Do you support Iran developing nuclear weapons for defensive use only?

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

The right to self defense vs. the right to pre-emptive aggression

Iran Warns of Pre-Emptive Action in Nuclear Dispute
By ALAN COWELL
Published: February 21, 2012
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
COMMENTS (93)
E-MAIL
PRINT
SINGLE PAGE
REPRINTS
SHARE

LONDON — As tension grew in its nuclear dispute with the West, Iran was reported on Tuesday to have struck an increasingly bellicose tone, warning that it would take pre-emptive action against perceived foes if it felt its national interests were threatened.

Connect With Us on Twitter
Follow @nytimesworld for international breaking news and headlines.
Twitter List: Reporters and Editors
Readers’ Comments
Share your thoughts.
Post a Comment »
Read All Comments (93) »
The warning by the deputy head of its armed forces, quoted by a semi-official news agency, came as Tehran also appeared to place limits on a visit by a team of United Nations nuclear officials, saying the investigators would not go to nuclear facilities, despite earlier reports that its members had sought permission to inspect a military complex outside Tehran.

Growing tensions over Iran’s disputed nuclear program have provoked speculation that Israel may be contemplating a military strike against nuclear facilities, which Tehran says are for peaceful purposes but which the West suspects are inching toward the capability to produce nuclear weapons.

Without mentioning Israel directly, Mohammed Hejazi, the deputy armed forces head, said on Tuesday: “Our strategy now is that if we feel our enemies want to endanger Iran’s national interests, and want to decide to do that, we will act without waiting for their actions,” Reuters reported. Divisions in Iran’s leadership make it difficult to interpret the government’s intentions, but the statement showed a new level of aggressiveness in Iran’s rhetoric.

The statement came a day after a team from the International Atomic Energy Agency arrived in Tehran on Monday for the second time in three weeks. The Associated Press quoted the Foreign Ministry spokesman, Ramin Mehmanparast, as saying the investigators from the International Atomic Energy Agency had no plans to visit the contentious nuclear sites, which the West maintains are part of a covert weapons program.

The inspectors did ask on Monday to see a military complex outside Tehran that is a suspected secret weapons-making location, Iranian radio said, according to The A.P. It was not clear whether the Iranian authorities had specifically turned down the reported request. I.A.E.A. officials did not immediately return calls seeking clarification.

As the I.A.E.A. delegation left its headquarters in Vienna late Sunday, its leader, Herman Nackaerts, said the delegation wished to investigate “the possible military dimensions” that Tehran insists the program does not have and that the inspectors’ previous visit did nothing to resolve.

===========NH:
Each nation has the right to self defense. As long as weapons are not used aggressively to attack before being attacked, each nation has the right to own weapons to defend itself.

Who has pushed Iran to the point where Iran is now acting like the low logic nations and adopting “pre-emptive” rights to attack before being attacked.
===========Null hypothesis//

The right to self defense vs. the right to pre-emptive aggression

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

NYTimes editoria re: Egypt Revolution

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Empty Talk on Tahrir Square
By TIM SEBASTIAN
Published: February 19, 2012
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
E-MAIL
PRINT
REPRINTS
SHARE

CAIRO — Someone has turned out the light in Tahrir Square, and that breathless, undreamed-of conviction that a better country was suddenly within grasp is no longer here.
Enlarge This Image

Marco Longari/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
A group of Egyptians gather near mock gallows in Tahrir Square.
Multimedia
INTERACTIVE FEATURE: The Digital Road to Egypt’s Revolution
Related in News

In Egypt, Signs of Accord Between Military Council and Islamists (January 23, 2012)
Related in Opinion

Opinion: Egypt’s Never-Ending Revolution (February 12, 2012)
Op-Ed Contributor: A Test for Egypt: Hearing All Voices (January 25, 2012)
Only the props remain — the rumor-sellers and spinners and blaring loudspeakers, the committed, the angry and those who still dream. But they seem to matter less these days. Or maybe we’ve heard them all before.

“We’ve agreed on a plan,” says a young man, as if carrying tablets down from the mountain. He shows us photos of his once-beaten face on his mobile phone. “We have a new initiative. Yes, we argued a lot amongst ourselves but now we’re going places.” But he won’t say where.

In the square, stories abound of sexual abuse. A woman is reported to have been raped last month in one of the tents, another was groped after she’d spoken at the podium and had to punch her way through a crowd of jeering men, none of whom lifted a finger to help her.

So even the moral high ground seems to have packed up and gone elsewhere. And with it one of the better-known presidential hopefuls — Mohamed Elbaradei, erstwhile champion of many revolutionaries — who didn’t want to play the game anymore because he didn’t like the rules. Or lack of them.

The military, he said, had assumed control of Egypt “as if no revolution had taken place and no regime had fallen.” And he may be right.

In December the generals did something that in almost any other country would have been outrageous and unimaginable. They offered the central bank a billion–dollar loan to help it through hard times.

Let’s be clear about this: The military high command was offering to loan the Egyptian people money that rightfully belongs to the country anyway — money that is exempt from public scrutiny and on which, as far as anyone can tell, not a penny in tax has ever been paid.

Of course the military has been allowed to run its own finances for decades. But consider this: In these days of political turmoil it takes a supremely confident and powerful group of men to offer the country back its own money and dress it up as largesse.

The move provoked not a single squeak of indignation from a new Parliament that has attached far greater importance to discussing when it should talk and when it should pray. Apparently, no one from this assembly is about to ask any awkward questions about this billion, or any other billion in military accounts. So the army can relax after all — the good times are here to stay.

Parliament’s unwillingness to confront the generals is understandable. After all, they still have higher than 80 percent approval ratings across the country — and they’re still making the key decisions. But it does mean that the new politicians’ first days at school risk being defined by what they won’t do, rather than what they will.

A recent survey of the assembly’s political parties, conducted by Amnesty International, found, for instance, a depressingly patchy response to the question of women’s rights and very little appetite to campaign for female equality.

More alarming, though, is the re-emergence of fear. Once again, I was told, Egyptians are starting to look over their shoulder to see who might be listening, to be careful what they say on the phone, to begin considering all over again who they can and cannot trust.

“The intelligence services are extremely active,” says a well-known commentator.

Fear has been a major by-product of the crisis over American NGOs, now facing prosecution in Egyptian courts and accusations that they were operating illegally in the country. Other foreign-funded organizations report a new hesitation from their Egyptian partners, a “let’s-put-this-on-hold” attitude, a sense that foreigners may become toxic.

That is serious. If the old curtain of fear descends again over Egypt then the climate could be right for a return to full-strength dictatorship. Fear would give it the power.

Of course “it” is chaotic. Of course “it” will take time. But few can agree what “it” is and large swathes of the public no longer seem interested.

Big Egypt, which creaked and trundled about its business for decades, is crying out for some certainty, some normality. The poor want to eat; the business community wants and needs to earn money; one in seven people, employed by the tourist industry, are desperate for the holiday makers to come back. And no one can understand why the dying goes on incessantly in the streets of Cairo and elsewhere.

I don’t hear too many predictions about Egypt’s future. But let me cite a couple of strong impressions: Egyptians have tasted revolution and will likely want to do so again. And no leader here can ever again count on a compliant, docile population.

For now, though, the share-out of spoils from last year’s revolt is more or less complete. Real power has gone back to the military; a Parliament of new faces gets to do the talking; a president is due to be elected later this year.

The only people who don’t seem to know that this uprising is over still argue and dream and make speeches in Tahrir Square.

Tim Sebastian is a television journalist and chairman of The New Arab Debates.

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Categories