waterworldeden4

Icon

When I respond, or seek responses, I think of the Internet Republic and the people [[whump]] and the places who have made our water world Eden brave and free and fair. Permitted, required, and impossible. Stand alone or stand with, whose choice to what degree [[Thn/]] O[[thn/]]ne water world Eden under "We the people" – created by whom?

(continued… @ WaterWorldEden5) [Whew Whew Whew]

(continued… @ WaterWorldEden5) [Whew Whew Whew]

[[door]]

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Work with me to exercise & train 3 ADA obesity reduction Afghan service K-9 Monthly duty rotation: 2 stay with u while I travel with 1 $500

Work with me to exercise & train 3 ADA obesity reduction Afghan service K-9 Monthly duty rotation: 2 stay with u while I travel with 1 $500

Afghan

6 Months, Male & Female, Health Certificate. 1 (M) 2 (F) well loved. Bicycle friendly. Need open field, off leash exercise. 10′ X 20′ X 6′ portable fencing provided. Work with me to train these 3 ADA obesity reduction service animals. Monthly duty rotation: 2 stay with u while I travel with 1 $500

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

‘H…’; xref: whose fears what dog might have been trained to sniff drugs; xref: ON the table, NOT under the table,”

‘H…’; xref: whose fears what dog might have been trained to sniff drugs; xref: ON the table, NOT under the table,”

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Olympic Thinker drug tests vs. “Yellow journalism”

Ryan injects momentum into Romney’s presidential bid

=======NH:
xref: injection drugs and whose gum chewing to compensate for the elevated tension caused by the stimulus.
=======NH//

Olympic Thinker drug tests vs. “Yellow journalism”

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Give proof

In Ill Doctor, a Surprise Reflection of Who Picks Assisted Suicide
Leah Nash for The New York Times

Dr. Richard Wesley, who received a diagnosis of Lou Gehrig’s disease in 2008, at home with his wife and two of his children.
By KATIE HAFNER
Published: August 11, 2012

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
E-mail
Share
Print
Single Page
Reprints

SEATTLE — Dr. Richard Wesley has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the incurable disease that lays waste to muscles while leaving the mind intact. He lives with the knowledge that an untimely death is chasing him down, but takes solace in knowing that he can decide exactly when, where and how he will die.

Under Washington State’s Death With Dignity Act, his physician has given him a prescription for a lethal dose of barbiturates. He would prefer to die naturally, but if dying becomes protracted and difficult, he plans to take the drugs and die peacefully within minutes.

“It’s like the definition of pornography,” Dr. Wesley, 67, said at his home here in Seattle, with Mount Rainier in the distance. “I’ll know it’s time to go when I see it.”

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Cup cakes; xref: reviving blood sugar level depletion caused by metabolizing heroin (opiates)

Cup cakes; xref: reviving blood sugar level depletion caused by metabolizing heroin (opiates)

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Reminder of what awaits further editing [””hnk]

Original draft of Heal-thy Aroostook – almost lost during editing, but found in a mail draft.

Would you like to do any of these things with, or without me, or delegate it, or not do it at all?

Become your family health guide – DMV style written and practical tests designed for each age group so anyone can receive a family health guide certificate. Lower health insurance rates… based upon the number of family members who are certified health guides – and who retest and keep their certificates up to date.

Add a Surgeon General’s button to the tool bar of all internet browsers sold in the US. When content on a page makes you feel it needs to be diagnosed an healed, simply click on the Surgeon General’s button and the page will be read by the Surgeon General’s web site where gmail – style content matching software and facebook ad campaign demographic software will analyze the content and match it with similar, alternate, more healthy content written and photographed by U.S. citizens, medical professionals, and who else has qualified to place what in the Surgeon General’s Data base. The ability to annotate pages and link genealogies of discussion to any location on the page motivates people to “‘Judge not that ye be not judged’, diagnose and heal so that you yourself might be,”

Food shopping software – Ah enough protein for 4 days in this package! Or – You need 4 more portions of green leafy vegetables to have six full meals in your shopping cart. Menu planning software: Daily, weekly, monthly nutrition calculated. Input the meals you want, get suggestions on other meals which would round out your nutrition. Assign comfort value to certain foods and work with the program to get a comfort index you can live with. 

Bicycle / ski to school. Have the school bus stop a mile away from school. Unlock your bicycle / skis from the school bike / ski station and ride / ski on the monitored school trail with your friend (s) to school. Issue ‘school bikes’ / skis like text books so you still have a bike / skis at home.

Require the words, “Clean air area only” replace the words “No smoking” on public signage and airport P.A. announcements.

File a lawsuit to have airport P.A. announcements rewritten. For example, “If you meet anyone you’d like to hang out with, or exchange gifts with, please return to the baggage scanner and rescan your bags together so you can be sure about your new friend (s),” instead of “Do not accept any items from unkown strangers” which discriminates against an entire class of people also known as “the general public” – and worse – leads to ingrown behaviors and a fear of engaging in free speech with anyone you choose until and unless they indicate otherwise – a freedom which leads to more physical activity rather than withdrawing into your own shell.

Require a surgeon general’s warning on the frame of all screens – “Screens can be hypnotic and may lead to physical and psychological addictions and harmful side effects of sedentary life styles”

Require five minutes of stretching exercises and isometrics at the end of each class before leaving the class room, or moving on to the next subject. Then have a 3 minute review of the lesson just finished after the stretching to reinforce the learning before moving on.

Require 15 or 20 minutes a day when there are NO scheduled tasks or study hall or cafeteria so students can think their own thoughts. Permit notes to be made during the last 5 or 7 minutes of the period.

Heroin – “You’ll want it for the rest of your life,” explore the concept of independence – stand with, or stand alone – whose choice to what degree? Relate it to the US Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution. Explain the difference between psychological and physical addiction. Also cognitive maps.

Work – Design a chart of compensating exercises to balance out the muscle groups various work tasks exercise so people can regain and maintain balance, posture, and what else?

Eye yoga exercises for screen bound workers.

Who requested a Surgeon General’s booklet for cigarette packs and got the Joe Camel advertising campaign booklet instead. Require aUS and / or Maine Surgeon General’s Warning booklet be attached or handed with each pack or carton of cigarettes sold. Likewise for Alcohol

Require TSA agents to meet or exceed basic physical fitness requirements. Obese agents must get a letter from their doctor and undergo a rehabilitation program and extra drug testing because obesity is a known side effect of opiate addiction for certain physiologies. According to one TSA supervisor in Washington, DC, TSA personnel are required to meet fitness standards when they are hired, but not afterwards. Why? Also they are checked only at the beginning and end of the day but have free ‘in and out’ privileges during the day. Heal-thy Mainers might want to be paid to do State Service on a schedule which permits us to carry on our own carriers yet gives us authority and access to inspect TSA agents, and other personnel who have the right to deprive us of our liberty or invade our privacy (xref: “The new Gestapo,” apology of Governor LePage) so we keep as careful an eye on them as they do on us and thereby reduce the temptation of organized and unorganized crime to infiltrate our security teams. Perhaps pilot projects with ipod Nano badges which record everything an officer hears and is uploaded into a data base the Chief retains for 90 days and is accessible by court order might lead to more motivation to put on the table what is under the table?

Have a Heal-thy Eating Center where anyone can come in for a free meal two or three times a month. The meals are models of nutrition balance, good eating habits, and socializing while eating. You get to take two or three pieces of fruit with you when you leave, and there are feed back forms and opportunities to talk to the staff and establish relationships where you can call in any time and chat a bit about a diet or exercise insight you’d like to share.

Service animals and obesity control – exercise motivation, and breaking addiction cycles – informally trained animals who will naturally motivate you and formally trained K-9’s who will back away at the smell of cigarette smoke, or any unclean air, and approach you only when you extinguish the tobacco, or move to a clean air area, and then reward you with a kiss, or lick. Or, another example –  grab your wrist when you try to move toward the smell of alcohol,except for “medical use,” which smells different from drinking alcohol.

Training you to train your dog – helps you train yourself to obey your own will power commands.

Training you to obey your dog’s signals – likewise

Permit students who win a trophy to visit the classrooms of lower grades (or upper grades?) and say a few words about it.

“A house divided cannot stand” – motivating under the table cross border smugglers of controlled substances to work with the “on the table” trust networks to create pilot projects which permit the US Postal Service and USDA to administer pilot projects for taxed, legal access, buddy systems, legal environments, and increased penalties if the legal access is abused or causes harm to others; xref: “Sign me up for next week,”

Sewer water test monitoring equipment attached to the main outflow of the University of Maine campuses – so we can report what is going through the student body as part of the daily weather report. The goal is to make controlled substances truly ‘controlled’ via self control and buddy systems, and legal, healthy environments and increased penalties for abuse of legal access or harm to others – instead of actually ‘forbidden’ and out of control and “around the corner” and in the alley where the devil can really get ahold of our youth and at risk population – with whom of the very people we pay to protect us from abuse participating in the under the table economies; 

xref; 2/3 rds of the NYC police department found guilty of distributing narcotics during the Vietnam war when Frank Lucas organized the smuggling of heroin into the US via the coffins of G.I.’s; xref: Robert Gates giving permission to have US coffins photographed with family consent after this was first posted. Note the Thames River in London was reported in an A-1 article with full page photo as testing positive for cocaine by “The Examiner” newspaper of Washington, DC after who first mentioned this idea in a bike shop across the street from a US Marine Corps. Barracks. Part of health is improving both our conscious recognition and unconscious autopilot skills. Monitoring sewer and water is also a national security duty.

Make “Officers of the Peace” instead of “Law Enforcement Officers” the title for Maine State Troopers and Police so we all think of ‘Peace” and “a more perfect Union” rather than ‘force’ and an “Us vs. them” mentality when we use the term.

Ask Mainers to, “Rewrite your job description the way you think it could best be done. (Both for the tasks and your personal life)” Keep a private diary of your job re-writes, discuss issues with your co-workers, and on inauguration day when we ring the bell, then hand in your suggestions to your chain of command for peer review and implementation – so we can do things the way YOU think they should be done.

More duty shift rotations – variety and health go hand in hand. Likewise redundancy in having more than one person who can do any particular job.

Make stronger adult / child relationships – permit Maine LLC’s to form with four men and four women who agree to adopt and / or conceive [low rpms] 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 children – rear, educate, endow, and emancipate them – so there are ALWAYS at least TWO adults home for the children and up to six adults can work to support the LLC team – with flexibility for duty shift rotations. Each adult gets one regularly scheduled night or time or turn alone with each other adult – including your night by yourself, and all the adults have the duty to know and do certain things. Silent partners may be permitted by the articles and bylaws of the LLC. Similar to grandparents, the silent partners have a more distant relationship with the adults and children, but can provide financial, emotional, and duty shift rotation support in ways similar to grandparents. Why continue to let the corporations divide and conquer the American family? Why continue to raise latch key children with screen baby sitters while two parents must work to support the family? In the case of China, the 8 adults might care for only 4 children. When times are tough, and work is scarce outside the home, LLC adults can provide “sweat equity” by making improvements in the home or other assets of the LLC.

Require community clinics to be established within 100 yards of emergency rooms so non-emergency cases can be referred.

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Hypnotists’ dependcy upon flushing

Hypnotists' dependcy upon flushing - Screen Shot 2012-07-21 at 8.24.43 AM

Hypnotists’ dependcy upon flushing – Screen Shot 2012-07-21 at 8.24.43 AM

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Does anybody know anybody who might know some mosque willing to participate in DC Juvenile mental health court? [[thn/]

Does anybody know anybody who might know some mosque willing to participate in DC Juvenile mental health court? [[thn/] https://waterworldeden4.wordpress.com/2012/03/19/does-anybody-know-anybody-who-might-know-some-mosque-which-would-like-to-participate-in-the-dc-juvenile-mental-health-court-system/

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Does anybody know anybody who might know some mosque which would like to participate in the DC Juvenile mental health court system?

Asalam wa lay kum, brother Abucar:

Here’s an article about DC Mental Health Court for Juveniles; xref: the idea mosques who chose to could offer probation services in the form of permitting juveniles on probation to participate in prayer line and verifying who actually attended.

Does anybody know anybody who might know some mosque which would like to participate in the DC Juvenile mental health court system?

xref: strong Islamic families, self control, and memorization of the Qur~an vs. Sex, drugs, and rock and roll (hypnosis)

Asalam wa laykum, brother how are you? and how is your family? And how is everything?

haji Mohammed, aka, William

#718 of 720: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 18 Mar 2012 (06:46 PM)

At D.C. Superior Court program, a focus on helping minors with mental
health problems

Mark Gail/THE WASHINGTON POST – Judge Joan Goldfrank runs the
juvenile mental health diversion court in Washington.
Text Size PrintE-mailReprints
By Justin Moyer, Published: March 15

JM-4 in D.C. Superior Court isn’t your typical courtroom.

No one is on trial. Defendants, called “respondents,” are surrounded
by social workers, psychologists and, often, family members. There’s no
mention of the criminal charges against them.

7
Comments
Weigh InCorrections?

Personal Post
More crime and safety news
Man fatally stabbed in Brookland-area bar
Jeremy Borden 7:15 AM ET
A man was stabbed early Sunday morning and died at a local hospital a
short time later.
District man found fatally shot in Northeast
Keith L. Alexander MAR 17
21-year-old found with multiple gunshot wounds.
Pr. George’s officer returns from Afghanistan
Matt Zapotosky MAR 16
Prince George’s County Police Officer Kevin Cruz, a reservist and Navy
petty officer first class, was welcomed home Friday.
Read more

But don’t be deceived. A lot is at stake in JM-4, home of a
14-month-old juvenile court intended to help minors with mental health
problems avoid the harsh consequences and limited rehabilitation
opportunities in the juvenile system.

Known formally as the juvenile mental health diversion court, it is
the latest stop for Magistrate Judge Joan Goldfrank, who has spent much
of her career on the bench navigating the intersection of mental
health and criminal justice.

In JM-4, where art by young people who have passed through the
courtroom hangs on the walls, Goldfrank dispenses encouragement, wisdom
— and snacks.

“The message I want to give them is that they are supported,”
Goldfrank said. “The whole point of juvenile justice is rehabilitation.
How could we not do it on the kids’ side?”

In recent years, the District’s courts and social services agencies
have increased mental health resources for young people, although
advocates say the efforts still fall short of the need. Recently, the
D.C. Council gave preliminary approval to legislation that would expand
mental health services in the city’s public schools.

On a couple of days last month, The Washington Post was permitted to
observe proceedings in juvenile mental health court on the condition
that none of the participants or their families be identified.

For the mother of a 17-year-old girl, the court was the latest stop in
a frustrating effort to obtain help. After her daughter “got in
trouble” — the mother wouldn’t go into details — the family had
difficulty working with probation officers, coordinating curfews and
developing an education plan.

“They were sending me all around the world when it first came out for
me trying to seek help for my daughter,” the mother said. “They were
telling me to sign my parental rights away.” For her, Goldfrank’s court
was different. “I felt that she still listened to me,” the mother
said.

Goldfrank does listen, but she and the people who work with her also
deliver news that families don’t want to hear. The young people must
not only be held accountable for their behavior but also must come to
terms with their mental health diagnoses, which are often rooted in
trauma that the juveniles have witnessed or experienced.

Accepting that can be hard. Asked by a reporter about her daughter’s
problems, the 17-year-old’s mother said she wasn’t aware that her
daughter had received a diagnosis for any mental health issue.

Indeed, overcoming family apprehension is one of the challenges the
court faces. “Nobody wants to be known as the kid who’s suffering from
depression or suffering from PTSD,” said Superior Court Judge Zoe Bush,
who, as head of the Family Court division, helped design the program.
“It’s not a weakness if you’ve lost someone close to you, to get
treatment for depression or dealing with that loss.”

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#719 of 720: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 18 Mar 2012 (06:49 PM)

At D.C. Superior Court program, a focus on helping minors with mental
health problems

Mark Gail/THE WASHINGTON POST – Judge Joan Goldfrank runs the
juvenile mental health diversion court in Washington.
Text Size PrintE-mailReprints
D.C.’s juvenile mental health diversion court, one of about a dozen
similar courts around the country, is part of a broader movement toward
“problem-solving” courts that try to tackle social problems such as
drug use and prostitution without incarcerating offenders.

D.C. Superior Court’s diversion programs have included an adult mental
health court and adult drug court. There was as a prostitution court,
but it was discontinued.

Personal Post
More crime and safety news
Man fatally stabbed in Brookland-area bar
Jeremy Borden 7:15 AM ET
A man was stabbed early Sunday morning and died at a local hospital a
short time later.
District man found fatally shot in Northeast
Keith L. Alexander MAR 17
21-year-old found with multiple gunshot wounds.
Pr. George’s officer returns from Afghanistan
Matt Zapotosky MAR 16
Prince George’s County Police Officer Kevin Cruz, a reservist and Navy
petty officer first class, was welcomed home Friday.
Read more

When mental health courts work — and some experts say the results are
mixed — they reduce the number of offenders behind bars while linking
people to services that can help them avoid being arrested again.

In the District, a minor charged with an eligible offense — mostly
misdemeanors and nonviolent offenses such as attempting to flee a law
enforcement officer or driving while intoxicated — can apply to have a
case diverted to Goldfrank’s court if the youth has a mental health
diagnosis, such as generalized anxiety disorder or social phobia.

Instead of facing incarceration, which can increase the odds that the
juvenile will re-offend, juveniles in diversion must deal with their
problem behavior. If they’re cutting school, they have to go back, or
consider getting a GED or a job. If they’re doing drugs, they have to
get tested and get treatment. If they need therapy, they have to see a
psychologist.

If they succeed, they graduate from the program and have their cases
dismissed. If they fail, they may find their cases back on the regular
juvenile calendar.

“You can’t overstate how important it is to have real interventions
that are targeted to the real needs of the youth,” Bush said.

Bush used to run D.C.’s juvenile drug court, and she said she saw kids
there who, “80 to 90 percent of the time,” were smoking marijuana to
self-medicate for undiagnosed mental health problems.

“If you just get the kids to stop smoking, that anxiety and depression
and trauma is still untreated,” she said. “You really want to get to
the underlying problem that they are self-treating and self-medicating.
If you do that, you’re getting them to adjust better at home, at
school and in the community.”

Whether the new mental health diversion court is meeting those
objectives will be the subject of two internal reviews by D.C. Superior
Court.

Early statistics are encouraging. A report from the D.C. Department of
Mental Health showed that 56 juveniles were enrolled in diversion in
2011. Eight, or 14 percent, were re-arrested, compared with 40 percent
in regular court. Nationally, the re-arrest rate is 60 percent,
according to the report.

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#720 of 720: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 18 Mar 2012 (06:52 PM)

At D.C. Superior Court program, a focus on helping minors with mental
health problems

Mark Gail/THE WASHINGTON POST – Judge Joan Goldfrank runs the
juvenile mental health diversion court in Washington.
Text Size PrintE-mailReprints
D.C.’s juvenile mental health diversion court, one of about a dozen
similar courts around the country, is part of a broader movement toward
“problem-solving” courts that try to tackle social problems such as
drug use and prostitution without incarcerating offenders.

D.C. Superior Court’s diversion programs have included an adult mental
health court and adult drug court. There was as a prostitution court,
but it was discontinued.

Personal Post
More crime and safety news
Man fatally stabbed in Brookland-area bar
Jeremy Borden 7:15 AM ET
A man was stabbed early Sunday morning and died at a local hospital a
short time later.
District man found fatally shot in Northeast
Keith L. Alexander MAR 17
21-year-old found with multiple gunshot wounds.
Pr. George’s officer returns from Afghanistan
Matt Zapotosky MAR 16
Prince George’s County Police Officer Kevin Cruz, a reservist and Navy
petty officer first class, was welcomed home Friday.
Read more

When mental health courts work — and some experts say the results are
mixed — they reduce the number of offenders behind bars while linking
people to services that can help them avoid being arrested again.

In the District, a minor charged with an eligible offense — mostly
misdemeanors and nonviolent offenses such as attempting to flee a law
enforcement officer or driving while intoxicated — can apply to have a
case diverted to Goldfrank’s court if the youth has a mental health
diagnosis, such as generalized anxiety disorder or social phobia.

Instead of facing incarceration, which can increase the odds that the
juvenile will re-offend, juveniles in diversion must deal with their
problem behavior. If they’re cutting school, they have to go back, or
consider getting a GED or a job. If they’re doing drugs, they have to
get tested and get treatment. If they need therapy, they have to see a
psychologist.

If they succeed, they graduate from the program and have their cases
dismissed. If they fail, they may find their cases back on the regular
juvenile calendar.

“You can’t overstate how important it is to have real interventions
that are targeted to the real needs of the youth,” Bush said.

Bush used to run D.C.’s juvenile drug court, and she said she saw kids
there who, “80 to 90 percent of the time,” were smoking marijuana to
self-medicate for undiagnosed mental health problems.

“If you just get the kids to stop smoking, that anxiety and depression
and trauma is still untreated,” she said. “You really want to get to
the underlying problem that they are self-treating and self-medicating.
If you do that, you’re getting them to adjust better at home, at
school and in the community.”

Whether the new mental health diversion court is meeting those
objectives will be the subject of two internal reviews by D.C. Superior
Court.

Early statistics are encouraging. A report from the D.C. Department of
Mental Health showed that 56 juveniles were enrolled in diversion in
2011. Eight, or 14 percent, were re-arrested, compared with 40 percent
in regular court. Nationally, the re-arrest rate is 60 percent,
according to the report.

“I’m saying we’re cautiously excited,” said Marie Morilus-Black, the
mental health agency’s director of children and youth services. “The
recidivism rate — we’re just blown away by it. It’s actually showing
that it’s working.”

Juveniles are generally prosecuted by the D.C. attorney general’s
office, and Assistant Attorney General Rachele Reid is the prosecutor
assigned to the juvenile mental health court. In an interview, Reid
said that diversion efforts fit into the city’s objectives.

“Families and communities are looking for alternatives to detention,
but we are there to ensure public safety,” said Reid, who sees up to 30
families a week in JM-4. “Believe it or not, the mind-set of our
section . . . is to be looking to diversion programs.”
After all, treatment can prevent crimes. As Reid puts it: “We don’t
want them back here.”

James L. Nolan, a sociology professor at Williams College who has
written two books on problem-solving courts, said enthusiasm should be
tempered. Although the first mental health court was established in
1997, in Florida, it’s not clear how well such programs stop bad
behavior.

“It is not uncommon for local court programs to exaggerate success
rates,” Nolan said. “This clearly happened in the early years of the
drug court movement. Many of the locally generated evaluations
had serious design flaws. This did not dissuade most problem-solving
advocates, nor did it seem to dampen the general enthusiasm for these
programs.”

But teenagers such as a 17-year old who was referred to diversion in
October offer the staff hope that juvenile mental health court will
succeed.

The teenager was already attending drug treatment programming at
Federal City Recovery Services in Southeast Washington twice a week,
and the diversion program offered her the prospect of avoiding
traditional prosecution.

After almost six months in the diversion program, she graduated last
month with a framed certificate of completion, a letter from the office
of the attorney general, a gift-wrapped copy of “Anne Frank: The Diary
of a Young Girl” and a handshake from Goldfrank.

“This isn’t something I want you to hang in your bathroom,” Goldfrank
said, stepping from behind the bench — a rare sight in other courtrooms
— to hand the young woman her certificate. “When problems come up,
don’t feel like you have to sort them out yourself.”

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Categories