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When I respond, or seek responses, I think of the Internet Republic and the people [[whump]] and the places who have made our water world Eden brave and free and fair. Permitted, required, and impossible. Stand alone or stand with, whose choice to what degree [[Thn/]] O[[thn/]]ne water world Eden under "We the people" – created by whom?

Mot-hers and Fat-hers – Screen Shot 2012 – 09 – 09 at 12.02.27 PM

Mot-hers and Fat-hers - Screen Shot 2012-09-09 at 12.02.27 PM

Mot-hers and Fat-hers – Screen Shot 2012-09-09 at 12.02.27 PM

#565 of 565: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 09 Sep 2012 (01:15 PM)

From: ScreenName31415 CityHall12357
Subject: Response to “Why Fathers Really Matter” by JUDITH
SHULEVITZ
Date: September 9, 2012 12:13:08 PM AKDT
To: letters@nytimes.com

#563 of 564: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 09 Sep 2012 (01:00 PM)

http://www.redtube.com/201028

=======NH:
xref: NYTimes.com “Sunday Review” – “Why Fathers Really Matter” –
Mothers have long been scrutinized. But through epigenetics, the male
also molds his children. What he eats, his age, his income – it all
can
affect the health of the baby.”

xref: Mot-her and Fat-her; xref: [rpms] associating the oral – what
the Mother and baby get to eat re: prenatal and infant nutrition, with
what the Father gets to eat; therefore associating the oral with the
cunnicular during pregnancy to link the nutrition of what goes in the
Father’s mouth with the nutrition needs of the Mother and the baby.

Note Lesbian pool party is extremely oral and cunnicular.

However, the pre-natal aspects are missing; xref: the common problem
of touch and motion videos shying away from pro-creation, aka,
reproduction out of fear of backlash against associating such degrees
of intimacy with family behaviors perhaps.

But to get beyond “ringing the door bells” so to speak, no matter how
intimate or rough,
or demanding whose sa’i of back and forth might be, the issue of the
baby and the love for the family as well as the competitive ectasy of
the performers needs to be addressed.

Therefore the U.S. Surgeon General button on all browser tool bars
sold in the United States needs to link these kinds of oral and
cunnicular issues with nutrition and procreation. The curiosity of
seeing into the tunnel of love – the birth canal – and the process of
opening the birth canal through such energetic sa’i of passion – needs
to meet the full
reality of the baby coming OUT of the birth canal – head first.
Perhaps time lapse photography of 9 months of pregnancy and 9 months
of infancy intercut with 19 minutes of passion?

Thus instead of the Sisyphus futility of rolling the rock (libidinal
desire) up the hill, only to have it roll down and need to be rolled
back up again, and again, and again… the libido, ego, and super-eto
of the touch and motion fascination gets the full story of the next
generation emerging from the back and forth sa’i of ectasy and then
needing to learn to
feed, shelter, and clothe, one another in the hear and now, while also
saving for a rainy day… thus the story of dependent “My Fair Lady”
becomes the story of the emancipating and empowering touch and motion.

Perhaps a split screen to show the normal day to day work involved in
acquiring and dividing one quarter of your income on food, shelter,
clothing, and savings each – while the hot touch and motion of “social
intimacy” on the other half of the screen rivets the attention of who
seeks to know more about such a powerful ‘language’ would be the way
the US Surgeon General intimacy coaching links would work to help whom
comprehend, and upgrade, diagnose, heal, perfect, protect, and promote
ever more healthy, emancipating, empowering intimacy, vs. simply
letting who go wild ringing doorbells without the follow through to
give proof of pulling whose self up by the bootstraps to be able to
better fulfill basic human needs of food, shelter, clothing, and
savings.

Already the touch and motion industry has a pattern of showing office
scenes and
classroom scenes and work scenes which are diverted into touch and
motion, but only one ending who can clearly recall – the machinist at
his lathe, ends with the diversion into touch and motion ending and
then
who returning to work with redoubled energy.

This could be in the form of a flash back memory while making love –
so the split screen would continue to carry the on-going intimacy
after
the recall climaxed. Then while who got clean enough to pray, prayed,
and went back to work to earn whose right to make whose next prayer
who
would still have the allure of the ongoing intimacy which might not
climax until the split screen began it’s next round of intimacy after
whose next required, or voluntary prayer.

Your right to pray, is your right to pause, and say, in this “Move
along,” world [lamp dims]

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

‘H…’; xref: whose fears what dog might have been trained to sniff drugs; xref: ON the table, NOT under the table,”

‘H…’; xref: whose fears what dog might have been trained to sniff drugs; xref: ON the table, NOT under the table,”

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

“Beddy Bye”

#351 of 352: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 02 Sep 2012 (02:37 AM)

“Beddy Bye” “Dennis the Menace”; xref: Helen Reddy, “I am Woman”;
xref: “Unbiased, consistent logic applied equally to both men and
women, especially regarding intimacy; xref: “…because every part of
your mind and body are equally worthy of being loved and cared for – as
long [Achoo ah] as you keep [Achoo ah] [Achoo ah] your mind and body
clean, and healthy, and open to your ul [Achoo!] ultimate principles:
eternal life, liberty, and the pursuit of peaceful happen ing ness es.
Isn’t that right?”

volley2.ind 175: ?>*:\ …//2012:08:29:21:17:135*
#352 of 352: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 02 Sep 2012 (02:47 AM)

So, identify why who stands with, or stands alone – whose choice, to
what degree – and compare those reasons to more independent, more
equal, more constitutional possibilities which satisfy the same needs,
but in more healthy ways. Be realistic – health is like sports: not
everyone has the motivation, or body type, or time to be a professional
athlete, but most people can achieve recreational, or amateur goals.
The Olympics started as, and ostensibly still are, amateur competitors.
So have a range of healthier alternatives and generational migration
strategies for emancipating whom from DEPENDENCY to Independence

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Upside and downside risk

Upside and downside risk

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Give proof

In Ill Doctor, a Surprise Reflection of Who Picks Assisted Suicide
Leah Nash for The New York Times

Dr. Richard Wesley, who received a diagnosis of Lou Gehrig’s disease in 2008, at home with his wife and two of his children.
By KATIE HAFNER
Published: August 11, 2012

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SEATTLE — Dr. Richard Wesley has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the incurable disease that lays waste to muscles while leaving the mind intact. He lives with the knowledge that an untimely death is chasing him down, but takes solace in knowing that he can decide exactly when, where and how he will die.

Under Washington State’s Death With Dignity Act, his physician has given him a prescription for a lethal dose of barbiturates. He would prefer to die naturally, but if dying becomes protracted and difficult, he plans to take the drugs and die peacefully within minutes.

“It’s like the definition of pornography,” Dr. Wesley, 67, said at his home here in Seattle, with Mount Rainier in the distance. “I’ll know it’s time to go when I see it.”

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

“A Sweet Victory”; xref: Why do heroin (opiate) users crave sugar?

03-11-2002 23:09
what i found…
Heroin addicts have shown flat glucose tolerance curves, with an exaggerated and delayed insulin response following oral glucose loading. Heroin addicts have a markedly reduced acute insulin response to glucose administered intravenously and have low potassium values.
http://www.diet-and-health.net/Nutri…ellaneous.html
apparently, opiates can induce an almost hypoglycemic state, and thus a craving for sugars and food in general.
[ 03 November 2002: Message edited by: Frunobulax ]

CHRONOLOGIC POSTS

why do opiates make you crave sugar?
#1
kristofires
Bluelighter
Join Date
Nov 2002
Posts
94
03-11-2002 19:31
does anyone else crave sweets while on opiates? i swear sometimes i have to have ice cream when im on methadone.
[ 03 November 2002: Message edited by: kristofires ]

#2
negrogesic
Bluelight Crew
Join Date
Jul 2002
Location
Negronesia
Posts
4,720
03-11-2002 21:26
I am not sure either, but they definately do. I remember reading instructions for fentanyl use in animals, and it said that due to the “euphoria”, the dogs may start eating excessively (and to limit food accordingly). The reason why sweet food in particular, im am not sure….

#3
Frunobulax
Bluelighter
Join Date
Nov 2002
Location
NY
Posts
208
03-11-2002 23:09
what i found…
Heroin addicts have shown flat glucose tolerance curves, with an exaggerated and delayed insulin response following oral glucose loading. Heroin addicts have a markedly reduced acute insulin response to glucose administered intravenously and have low potassium values.
http://www.diet-and-health.net/Nutri…ellaneous.html
apparently, opiates can induce an almost hypoglycemic state, and thus a craving for sugars and food in general.
[ 03 November 2002: Message edited by: Frunobulax ]

#4
islandhunk
Bluelighter
Join Date
Jul 2002
Posts
2
05-11-2002 02:02
thanx for the info.

#5
raoulduke
Bluelighter
Join Date
Oct 2002
Location
Ontario, Canada
Posts
630
05-11-2002 02:05
Good question. I haven’t really noticed this that much, sometimes when my opiates hit I get hungry for any food but after they take full effect I loose my appetite immediatley.

#6
KRISTOPH
Bluelighter
Join Date
Nov 2002
Posts
54
05-11-2002 02:12
THIS IS KRISTOFIRE. i lost my password and forgot which email addy i used to register.
anyways, thanx. i crave sweets bad. for some reason dilaudids and methadone makes me crave sweets. oc’s did not that much. i couldnt eat anything while doing oc’s.

#7
silverfucked
Bluelighter
Join Date
Dec 2001
Location
TN
Posts
2,704
05-11-2002 03:30
Once opiates wear off i notice i am repulsed by 2 things.
1.Loud noises, opiates make my ears sensitive.
2. Anything sweet, it just tastes godawful for some reason.
Maybe im different?

#8
KRISTOPH
Bluelighter
Join Date
Nov 2002
Posts
54
05-11-2002 12:59
how long have you been on them silver? i was a heavy user for more than 1 year. everyday i was doing a good amount of oc’s.
maybe its just me. i have met other people that do a bag of heroin and light a cig and go straight for the ice cream. i dont know how people drink alcohol and do opiates. i never crave alcohol while doing them.

#9
silverfucked
Bluelighter
Join Date
Dec 2001
Location
TN
Posts
2,704
06-11-2002 04:28
Ive been doing codeine, hydro, and oxy off and on for a little over a year now.. Sugar just seems to make my stomach unhappy, and taste artificial.. Prob just me.

#10
enkephalin
Bluelighter
Join Date
Mar 2002
Location
seattle
Posts
45
06-11-2002 05:12
I notice I crave sugar while on opiates. It is similar to getting a food craving while having the munchies but more intense.

#11
FreakK
Bluelighter
Join Date
Jan 2002
Location
illinois
Posts
99
06-11-2002 06:06
i suffer from the same side effect u mentioned in NUMBER 1 in your post SILVERFUCKED..its is quite annoying as well…NUMBER 2, i dont get that effect..
i NEVER craved sugar while taking OXY either, i had an appetite for any type of foods, but with HEROIN, all i really have a taste to eat is pure JUNK FOOD, like cookies, ice cream, candy bars etc etc…i would say it would be rough keeping a good diet going while hitting a heavy smack habit..

#12
canabud
Bluelighter
Join Date
Mar 2002
Posts
56
06-11-2002 20:38
I usually crave sugar after coming down from a good oc high. The one thing i crave bad when railing a big line is coffee in the morning and a cold beer at night. They just go together so well. Maybe its just me… Other people i know dont want anything to do with alchohol or eating.

#13
d1giPhux
Bluelighter
Join Date
Nov 2002
Location
Antarctica
Posts
85
06-11-2002 21:54
Prolly makes ur blood sugar low. That will give you the munchies for sugar like a mutha.

#14
KRISTOPH
Bluelighter
Join Date
Nov 2002
Posts
54
07-11-2002 04:41
canabud your like my friend who intriduced me to oxys. he loved beer and oxys. personally it took my craving for alcohol away totally. i gave up drinking totally once i started doing oxys.
thank you for the input. it looks like some crave sugar and some dont. interesting.

#15
FreakK
Bluelighter
Join Date
Jan 2002
Location
illinois
Posts
99
07-11-2002 05:23
FUCK,

========NH:
PLEASE READ ‘CRUCIFY’ FOR ‘FUCK’ THROUGHOUT.
========NULL HYPOTHESIS//

there is no way i would drink ALCOHOL after taking OXY or any OPIATE..OPIATES totally satisfy my druggy urges to where i dont even think or need to take anything else, especially ALCOHOL..i would think ALCOHOL would ruin a good OPIATE high..
ALCOHOL is fucking nasty and should only be consumed if you take regular drug tests, or if you have absolutely NOTHING else to take!!

#16
Tar Baby
Bluelighter
Join Date
Feb 2006
Posts
105
22-02-2006 19:13
Originally Posted by FreakK
FUCK, there is no way i would drink ALCOHOL after taking OXY or any OPIATE..OPIATES totally satisfy my druggy urges to where i dont even think or need to take anything else, especially ALCOHOL..i would think ALCOHOL would ruin a good OPIATE high..
ALCOHOL is fucking nasty and should only be consumed if you take regular drug tests, or if you have absolutely NOTHING else to take!!
I agree…alcohol is for homeless people..

#17
SolidForm
Bluelighter
Join Date
Feb 2006
Posts
228
22-02-2006 19:27
I eat starburst all day.

I love candy like that. Mambas, starburst, tootsie roll frooties. Even a nice hit from the squeeze pop bottle. Love it.

Sugar is a huge part of my high. I crave it intensely.

#18
CafeContin
Bluelighter
Join Date
Jun 2004
Posts
487
22-02-2006 20:28
I personally don’t crave sugar especially, more just food in general. I can wake up and be completely not hungry, do a shot and immediately need something to eat.

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Gary Fuller re: health code

Gary Fuller re: health code

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Does anybody know anybody who might know some mosque willing to participate in DC Juvenile mental health court? [[thn/]

Does anybody know anybody who might know some mosque willing to participate in DC Juvenile mental health court? [[thn/] https://waterworldeden4.wordpress.com/2012/03/19/does-anybody-know-anybody-who-might-know-some-mosque-which-would-like-to-participate-in-the-dc-juvenile-mental-health-court-system/

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Does anybody know anybody who might know some mosque which would like to participate in the DC Juvenile mental health court system?

Asalam wa lay kum, brother Abucar:

Here’s an article about DC Mental Health Court for Juveniles; xref: the idea mosques who chose to could offer probation services in the form of permitting juveniles on probation to participate in prayer line and verifying who actually attended.

Does anybody know anybody who might know some mosque which would like to participate in the DC Juvenile mental health court system?

xref: strong Islamic families, self control, and memorization of the Qur~an vs. Sex, drugs, and rock and roll (hypnosis)

Asalam wa laykum, brother how are you? and how is your family? And how is everything?

haji Mohammed, aka, William

#718 of 720: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 18 Mar 2012 (06:46 PM)

At D.C. Superior Court program, a focus on helping minors with mental
health problems

Mark Gail/THE WASHINGTON POST – Judge Joan Goldfrank runs the
juvenile mental health diversion court in Washington.
Text Size PrintE-mailReprints
By Justin Moyer, Published: March 15

JM-4 in D.C. Superior Court isn’t your typical courtroom.

No one is on trial. Defendants, called “respondents,” are surrounded
by social workers, psychologists and, often, family members. There’s no
mention of the criminal charges against them.

7
Comments
Weigh InCorrections?

Personal Post
More crime and safety news
Man fatally stabbed in Brookland-area bar
Jeremy Borden 7:15 AM ET
A man was stabbed early Sunday morning and died at a local hospital a
short time later.
District man found fatally shot in Northeast
Keith L. Alexander MAR 17
21-year-old found with multiple gunshot wounds.
Pr. George’s officer returns from Afghanistan
Matt Zapotosky MAR 16
Prince George’s County Police Officer Kevin Cruz, a reservist and Navy
petty officer first class, was welcomed home Friday.
Read more

But don’t be deceived. A lot is at stake in JM-4, home of a
14-month-old juvenile court intended to help minors with mental health
problems avoid the harsh consequences and limited rehabilitation
opportunities in the juvenile system.

Known formally as the juvenile mental health diversion court, it is
the latest stop for Magistrate Judge Joan Goldfrank, who has spent much
of her career on the bench navigating the intersection of mental
health and criminal justice.

In JM-4, where art by young people who have passed through the
courtroom hangs on the walls, Goldfrank dispenses encouragement, wisdom
— and snacks.

“The message I want to give them is that they are supported,”
Goldfrank said. “The whole point of juvenile justice is rehabilitation.
How could we not do it on the kids’ side?”

In recent years, the District’s courts and social services agencies
have increased mental health resources for young people, although
advocates say the efforts still fall short of the need. Recently, the
D.C. Council gave preliminary approval to legislation that would expand
mental health services in the city’s public schools.

On a couple of days last month, The Washington Post was permitted to
observe proceedings in juvenile mental health court on the condition
that none of the participants or their families be identified.

For the mother of a 17-year-old girl, the court was the latest stop in
a frustrating effort to obtain help. After her daughter “got in
trouble” — the mother wouldn’t go into details — the family had
difficulty working with probation officers, coordinating curfews and
developing an education plan.

“They were sending me all around the world when it first came out for
me trying to seek help for my daughter,” the mother said. “They were
telling me to sign my parental rights away.” For her, Goldfrank’s court
was different. “I felt that she still listened to me,” the mother
said.

Goldfrank does listen, but she and the people who work with her also
deliver news that families don’t want to hear. The young people must
not only be held accountable for their behavior but also must come to
terms with their mental health diagnoses, which are often rooted in
trauma that the juveniles have witnessed or experienced.

Accepting that can be hard. Asked by a reporter about her daughter’s
problems, the 17-year-old’s mother said she wasn’t aware that her
daughter had received a diagnosis for any mental health issue.

Indeed, overcoming family apprehension is one of the challenges the
court faces. “Nobody wants to be known as the kid who’s suffering from
depression or suffering from PTSD,” said Superior Court Judge Zoe Bush,
who, as head of the Family Court division, helped design the program.
“It’s not a weakness if you’ve lost someone close to you, to get
treatment for depression or dealing with that loss.”

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#719 of 720: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 18 Mar 2012 (06:49 PM)

At D.C. Superior Court program, a focus on helping minors with mental
health problems

Mark Gail/THE WASHINGTON POST – Judge Joan Goldfrank runs the
juvenile mental health diversion court in Washington.
Text Size PrintE-mailReprints
D.C.’s juvenile mental health diversion court, one of about a dozen
similar courts around the country, is part of a broader movement toward
“problem-solving” courts that try to tackle social problems such as
drug use and prostitution without incarcerating offenders.

D.C. Superior Court’s diversion programs have included an adult mental
health court and adult drug court. There was as a prostitution court,
but it was discontinued.

Personal Post
More crime and safety news
Man fatally stabbed in Brookland-area bar
Jeremy Borden 7:15 AM ET
A man was stabbed early Sunday morning and died at a local hospital a
short time later.
District man found fatally shot in Northeast
Keith L. Alexander MAR 17
21-year-old found with multiple gunshot wounds.
Pr. George’s officer returns from Afghanistan
Matt Zapotosky MAR 16
Prince George’s County Police Officer Kevin Cruz, a reservist and Navy
petty officer first class, was welcomed home Friday.
Read more

When mental health courts work — and some experts say the results are
mixed — they reduce the number of offenders behind bars while linking
people to services that can help them avoid being arrested again.

In the District, a minor charged with an eligible offense — mostly
misdemeanors and nonviolent offenses such as attempting to flee a law
enforcement officer or driving while intoxicated — can apply to have a
case diverted to Goldfrank’s court if the youth has a mental health
diagnosis, such as generalized anxiety disorder or social phobia.

Instead of facing incarceration, which can increase the odds that the
juvenile will re-offend, juveniles in diversion must deal with their
problem behavior. If they’re cutting school, they have to go back, or
consider getting a GED or a job. If they’re doing drugs, they have to
get tested and get treatment. If they need therapy, they have to see a
psychologist.

If they succeed, they graduate from the program and have their cases
dismissed. If they fail, they may find their cases back on the regular
juvenile calendar.

“You can’t overstate how important it is to have real interventions
that are targeted to the real needs of the youth,” Bush said.

Bush used to run D.C.’s juvenile drug court, and she said she saw kids
there who, “80 to 90 percent of the time,” were smoking marijuana to
self-medicate for undiagnosed mental health problems.

“If you just get the kids to stop smoking, that anxiety and depression
and trauma is still untreated,” she said. “You really want to get to
the underlying problem that they are self-treating and self-medicating.
If you do that, you’re getting them to adjust better at home, at
school and in the community.”

Whether the new mental health diversion court is meeting those
objectives will be the subject of two internal reviews by D.C. Superior
Court.

Early statistics are encouraging. A report from the D.C. Department of
Mental Health showed that 56 juveniles were enrolled in diversion in
2011. Eight, or 14 percent, were re-arrested, compared with 40 percent
in regular court. Nationally, the re-arrest rate is 60 percent,
according to the report.

volley2.ind 173: ?>*:\ …//2012:02:18:12:16:210*
#720 of 720: William Hale (hinging0) Sun 18 Mar 2012 (06:52 PM)

At D.C. Superior Court program, a focus on helping minors with mental
health problems

Mark Gail/THE WASHINGTON POST – Judge Joan Goldfrank runs the
juvenile mental health diversion court in Washington.
Text Size PrintE-mailReprints
D.C.’s juvenile mental health diversion court, one of about a dozen
similar courts around the country, is part of a broader movement toward
“problem-solving” courts that try to tackle social problems such as
drug use and prostitution without incarcerating offenders.

D.C. Superior Court’s diversion programs have included an adult mental
health court and adult drug court. There was as a prostitution court,
but it was discontinued.

Personal Post
More crime and safety news
Man fatally stabbed in Brookland-area bar
Jeremy Borden 7:15 AM ET
A man was stabbed early Sunday morning and died at a local hospital a
short time later.
District man found fatally shot in Northeast
Keith L. Alexander MAR 17
21-year-old found with multiple gunshot wounds.
Pr. George’s officer returns from Afghanistan
Matt Zapotosky MAR 16
Prince George’s County Police Officer Kevin Cruz, a reservist and Navy
petty officer first class, was welcomed home Friday.
Read more

When mental health courts work — and some experts say the results are
mixed — they reduce the number of offenders behind bars while linking
people to services that can help them avoid being arrested again.

In the District, a minor charged with an eligible offense — mostly
misdemeanors and nonviolent offenses such as attempting to flee a law
enforcement officer or driving while intoxicated — can apply to have a
case diverted to Goldfrank’s court if the youth has a mental health
diagnosis, such as generalized anxiety disorder or social phobia.

Instead of facing incarceration, which can increase the odds that the
juvenile will re-offend, juveniles in diversion must deal with their
problem behavior. If they’re cutting school, they have to go back, or
consider getting a GED or a job. If they’re doing drugs, they have to
get tested and get treatment. If they need therapy, they have to see a
psychologist.

If they succeed, they graduate from the program and have their cases
dismissed. If they fail, they may find their cases back on the regular
juvenile calendar.

“You can’t overstate how important it is to have real interventions
that are targeted to the real needs of the youth,” Bush said.

Bush used to run D.C.’s juvenile drug court, and she said she saw kids
there who, “80 to 90 percent of the time,” were smoking marijuana to
self-medicate for undiagnosed mental health problems.

“If you just get the kids to stop smoking, that anxiety and depression
and trauma is still untreated,” she said. “You really want to get to
the underlying problem that they are self-treating and self-medicating.
If you do that, you’re getting them to adjust better at home, at
school and in the community.”

Whether the new mental health diversion court is meeting those
objectives will be the subject of two internal reviews by D.C. Superior
Court.

Early statistics are encouraging. A report from the D.C. Department of
Mental Health showed that 56 juveniles were enrolled in diversion in
2011. Eight, or 14 percent, were re-arrested, compared with 40 percent
in regular court. Nationally, the re-arrest rate is 60 percent,
according to the report.

“I’m saying we’re cautiously excited,” said Marie Morilus-Black, the
mental health agency’s director of children and youth services. “The
recidivism rate — we’re just blown away by it. It’s actually showing
that it’s working.”

Juveniles are generally prosecuted by the D.C. attorney general’s
office, and Assistant Attorney General Rachele Reid is the prosecutor
assigned to the juvenile mental health court. In an interview, Reid
said that diversion efforts fit into the city’s objectives.

“Families and communities are looking for alternatives to detention,
but we are there to ensure public safety,” said Reid, who sees up to 30
families a week in JM-4. “Believe it or not, the mind-set of our
section . . . is to be looking to diversion programs.”
After all, treatment can prevent crimes. As Reid puts it: “We don’t
want them back here.”

James L. Nolan, a sociology professor at Williams College who has
written two books on problem-solving courts, said enthusiasm should be
tempered. Although the first mental health court was established in
1997, in Florida, it’s not clear how well such programs stop bad
behavior.

“It is not uncommon for local court programs to exaggerate success
rates,” Nolan said. “This clearly happened in the early years of the
drug court movement. Many of the locally generated evaluations
had serious design flaws. This did not dissuade most problem-solving
advocates, nor did it seem to dampen the general enthusiasm for these
programs.”

But teenagers such as a 17-year old who was referred to diversion in
October offer the staff hope that juvenile mental health court will
succeed.

The teenager was already attending drug treatment programming at
Federal City Recovery Services in Southeast Washington twice a week,
and the diversion program offered her the prospect of avoiding
traditional prosecution.

After almost six months in the diversion program, she graduated last
month with a framed certificate of completion, a letter from the office
of the attorney general, a gift-wrapped copy of “Anne Frank: The Diary
of a Young Girl” and a handshake from Goldfrank.

“This isn’t something I want you to hang in your bathroom,” Goldfrank
said, stepping from behind the bench — a rare sight in other courtrooms
— to hand the young woman her certificate. “When problems come up,
don’t feel like you have to sort them out yourself.”

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