waterworldeden4

Icon

When I respond, or seek responses, I think of the Internet Republic and the people [[whump]] and the places who have made our water world Eden brave and free and fair. Permitted, required, and impossible. Stand alone or stand with, whose choice to what degree [[Thn/]] O[[thn/]]ne water world Eden under "We the people" – created by whom?

Enlightened business offer (s) vs. Oil mafias

Pressed by U.S., Asian Countries Look for Ways to Reduce Purchases of Iranian Oil
By KEITH BRADSHER and CLIFFORD KRAUSS
Published: January 6, 2012
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
E-MAIL
PRINT
SINGLE PAGE
REPRINTS
SHARE

HONG KONG — Under growing pressure from the United States, some of Asia’s largest economies are reluctantly looking for options to reduce the amount of oil they buy from Iran, a move that would further tighten the economic vise on an increasingly defiant nation that announced plans for a new round of naval drills in the Strait of Hormuz.
Multimedia

Graphic
Iran’s Oil Exports
Related

Increasingly Isolated, Iranian Leader Set to Visit Allies in Latin America (January 7, 2012)
For Iranians Waylaid by Pirates, U.S. to the Rescue (January 7, 2012)
Times Topic: Iran

Connect With Us on Twitter
Follow @nytimesworld for international breaking news and headlines.
The decision by South Korea and Japan to try to accommodate Washington’s demands follows reports that China has already reduced its purchase of Iranian crude in the past month in a pricing dispute with Tehran. Whatever the motives, the combined loss of sales threatens an economy already reeling, where the currency has plummeted in value, inflation has surged and the general public has expressed growing anxiety about the prospect of war.

China, Japan, India and South Korea together import more than 60 percent of Iranian oil exports, and they all depend on Iran and other Persian Gulf producers for the preponderance of their oil and natural gas needs. As tensions in the gulf have escalated and alarmed Asian governments and businesses, companies and traders from those countries have been putting out feelers to places like Russia, Vietnam, West Africa, Iraq and especially Saudi Arabia to export more oil to them, according to oil experts.

For Tehran, which relies heavily on oil revenues to prop up an economy battered by years of sanctions, the potential cutbacks by its Asian customers follow a decision by the European Union to move toward a ban on the import of Iranian oil. Taken together, the Western efforts represent the most serious economic pressure yet on Iran after years of conflict over a nuclear program that the West charges is aimed at building weapons.

But if the goal is to force Iran to relent, the campaign has so far had an opposite effect: Iranian officials have equated targeting their oil market with economic war and threatened to block the Strait of Hormuz, where about one-fifth of the world’s oil passes to get to market.

The Iranian military, fresh off 10 days of naval exercises near the strait that ended this week, vowed to hold a new round of war games soon. The defense minister, Brig. Gen. Ahmad Vahidi, in comments reported by the semiofficial Fars News Agency Thursday, said the military’s exercises would be “its greatest naval war games” and would occur “in the same region in the near future.”

The United States, however, is keeping the pressure on.

Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner is scheduled to visit Beijing and Tokyo next week, and the tightening sanctions on Iran will be high on his agenda. United States officials said that Mr. Geithner will press China at least to resist importing more Iranian oil to replace exports that would otherwise go to Europe. The trip is part of a concerted effort by Western diplomats to persuade Asian countries to go along with new European sanctions, American and European officials say.

“It’s a global chess game,” said Daniel Yergin, the energy historian. “The major buyers are prudently beginning to make alternative plans to reduce their reliance on Iranian oil.”

The Asian efforts to wean themselves from Iranian crude are in response to legislation enacted by Congress at the end of last year requiring the administration to phase in sanctions in stages by late June that would make it very difficult for others to buy Iranian oil, by barring transactions with Iran’s central bank.

The sanctions exempt food, medicine and other humanitarian trade and include a presidential waiver for any country or company in cases in which the impact would harm the national security interests of the United States.

==============NH:
Xref: posting on Wednesday of proposed legislation for an exception to sanctions to permit Iran to deposit it’ s fuel rod in a bonded technology bank

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Paul. Ron Paul. Vote Ron Paul so US arms sales meet DMV standards – License, registration, insurance, THEN you may purchase $11 billion worth of arms from U.S. manufacturers [[thock]]

Weapons Sales to Iraq Move Ahead Despite U.S. Worries
By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT and ERIC SCHMITT
Published: December 28, 2011
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
COMMENTS (161)
E-MAIL
PRINT
SINGLE PAGE
REPRINTS
SHARE
BAGHDAD — The Obama administration is moving ahead with the sale of nearly $11 billion worth of arms and training for the Iraqi military despite concerns that Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki is seeking to consolidate authority, create a one-party Shiite-dominated state and abandon the American-backed power-sharing government.

HEADER PLACED AS FOOTER
Paul. Ron Paul. Vote Ron Paul so US arms sales meet DMV standards – License, registration, insurance, THEN you may purchase $11 billion worth of arms from U.S. manufacturers [[thock]]

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

xref: 16

Space Plan From China Broadens Challenge to U.S.
By EDWARD WONG and KENNETH CHANG
Published: December 29, 2011
RECOMMEND
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
COMMENTS (2)
E-MAIL
PRINT
SINGLE PAGE
REPRINTS
SHARE

BEIJING — Broadening its challenge to the United States, the Chinese government on Thursday announced an ambitious five-year plan for space exploration that could establish China as a major rival at a time when the American program is in retreat.
Related

Times Topic: China

Connect With Us on Twitter
Follow @nytimesworld for international breaking news and headlines.
Readers’ Comments
Share your thoughts.
Post a Comment »
Read All Comments (2) »
Coupled with China’s earlier vows to build a space station and put an astronaut on the moon, the announcement conjured up memories of the cold-war-era space race between the United States and the Soviet Union. The United States, which has de-emphasized manned spaceflight in recent years, is now dependent on Russia for transporting its astronauts to the International Space Station. Russia, for its part, has suffered an embarrassing string of failed satellite launchings.

China has been looking for ways to exert its growing economic strength and to demonstrate that its technological mastery and scientific achievements can approach those of any global power. The plan announced Thursday calls for launching a space lab and collecting samples from the moon, all by 2016, along with a more powerful manned spaceship and space freighters.

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Categories